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From Mormon Boy to Rent Boy: Interview with solo performer Steven Fales

They have a name for former LDS in Utah: Jack Mormons. You can leave the Mormon church, but the Mormon upbringing will never leave you. In his solo work CONFESSIONS…

(Left to right) Chris Melohn and Alex Kryger in Quince Production’s THE HAUNTED HOST (Photo credit: John Donges)

THE HAUNTED HOST (Quince Productions): Neon Nihilism

On a favor called in by a friend, the misanthropic Jay agrees to let a traveling college drop-out, Frank, crash on his couch for the night. Jay has given up on his dream of becoming a writer, while Frank eagerly seeks advice and guidance on his own play. However, in a great display of “neon nihilism,” Jay teases and bullies his straight guest Frank, who looks uncannily similar to Jay’s recently deceased boyfriend. As these men come to understand each other, and themselves, we discover what it means to sacrifice yourself for lovers, friends, and art.

Richie Sklar (l.) and Peter Zielinski in Geoffrey Nauffts' NEXT FALL. Photo by John Donges.

Queer and Christian: a preview of NEXT FALL (Quince, GayFest! 2014)

This Wednesday, Quince Productions continues an exciting GayFest! with the opening of Next Fall, playwright/actor Geoffrey Nauffts’ Tony Award-nominated play. Next Fall tackles big issues without big presumptions, approaching societal white…

Aurora Black, Erik Ransom, and Avery Royal in Libertine Idol’s COMING in FringeNYC (Photo credit: Michael Blase)

COMING (Libertine Idol Productions): The Battle of Glamageddon hits FringeNYC!

Self-proclaimed “heir to Sodom and Gomorrah,” the divinely talented writer/ actor/ singer/ musician/ composer/ “disaster in lipstick” Erik Ransom stars in a newly revised version of his 2011 Philadelphia smash hit COMING: A ROCK MUSICAL OF BIBLICAL PROPORTIONS for FringeNYC.

Alexander Kacala as Miss Fit in SOME ARE PEOPLE, part of GayFest! 2014.

SOME ARE PEOPLE (Quince, GayFest! 2014): Summer loving is no drag

SOME ARE PEOPLE is about summer people. Those people who come into our lives for a time and then go back to wherever they came from, leaving us changed forever.

Gizel Jimenez and ensemble in the Walnut's 2013 show IN THE HEIGHTS. Photo credit: Mark Garvin.

Walnut Street Theatre: Part 3, The Changing Shape of Philadelphia Theater

Katelyn Behrman’s three-part series on the Walnut Street Theatre concludes with a consideration of the Walnut’s place in the changing landscape of Philadelphia theater.

Mark Evans THE BOOK OF MORMON First National Tour © Joan Marcus, 2013

THE BOOK OF MORMON (Forrest Theatre): Grumpy Professor review

John “The Grumpy Professor D’Allessandro paid over $100 for a ticket to THE BOOK OF MORMON and thinks it was worth it.

Isa St. Clair, Allen Radway, and E. Ashley Izard in THE GLASS MENAGERIE. Photo by Kyle Cassidy.

Kyle Cassidy Photo Essay: THE GLASS MENAGERIE (Commonwealth Classic Theatre)

Kyle Cassidy photographs Commonwealth Classic Theatre Company’s production of Tennessee Williams’s THE GLASS MENAGERIE, now onstage at the Off Broad Street Theatre.

Standing on Ceremony

STANDING ON CEREMONY: THE GAY MARRIAGE PLAYS (Quince), GayFest! 2014.

“What’s really interesting to me is that in just a few years since “Standing on Ceremony” came out, some of the pieces are already ‘period pieces.’ There is, for instance, one piece about two women flying from California to Iowa because marriage is legal in Iowa but not California (it was while Proposition 8 was still making its way through the courts). And the two women are saying things like, ‘Can you believe we live in California and have to fly to Iowa to get married?’ Well that, of course, is no longer the case. So in a way it’s a primer on recent history and an indication of how quickly things change!”

Josh Kachnycz as Berowne in LOVE'S LABOUR'S LOST. Photo credit: John Bansemer.

LOVE’S LABOUR’S LOST (Philly Shakes): Cromie finds a feast of language and comedy

Under Aaron Cromie’s creative direction, Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre’s production of LOVE’S LABOUR’S LOST captures the playfulness of the Bard’s early comedy in a fluid romp.

The entire cast of the Second Annual One-Minute Play Festival at the InterAct, 2014. Photo credit: Seth Rozin.

The Second Annual One-Minute Play Festival (InterAct): Tipsy on Theater: Wine-tasting 90 plays and a night-out in Philly without a hangover

You step off the tour bus, the smell of exhaust replaced first with fresh air, then with the sugary smell of grapes. You sit around a bar with a wine…

Daniel Talbott

Playwright on Playwright: Two charming people interview one another

Daniel Talbott (You Know My Name: A Daniel Talbott Trio) and Kathleen Warnock (Some Are People), two of the playwrights with work in this year’s GayFest!, happen to be old friends and professional colleagues. These two unique personalities interview each other about their participation in Quince Productions’ festival, their writing habits, and a slew of other topics from desserts to dreams.

Walnut Street Theatre Studio 5.

The Walnut Street Theatre: Part 2, Crafting a Popular Season

In the second of her three-part series on the Walnut Street Theatre, Katelyn Behrman looks at how the Walnut puts together its season of popular productions, and considers the opportunities presented by the second stage and rented facilities.

Ama Bollinger stars in Chris Davis’s ANNA K (Photo credit: Courtesy of the artist)

Deb Miller’s 15 Top Picks for the 2014 Philadelphia Fringe Festival

Phindie will provide more Philly Fringe Festival coverage than any publication in the world! Coverage begins with 15 picks from star Phindie writer Deb Miller.

The Walnut opened as a circus theater in 1809.

The Walnut Street Theatre: Part 1, The People’s Playhouse

In the first section three-part series, Kathryn Behrman sits down with Walnut artistic director Bernard Havard and other local theater folk to consider the playhouse’s commitment to popular entertainment.

Deanna Gibson plays one of three witches in the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival’s MACBETH (Photo credit: Lee A. Butz)

MACBETH (Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival): A Minimalist Vision

Director Patrick Mulcahy takes a modernist approach to the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival’s production of MACBETH, with a 20th-century minimalist aesthetic that compels the audience to focus on the emotions and actions of the characters and the power of the playwright’s language. It’s stark and intense, and also, at times, oddly anachronistic and comical, performed in attire that suggests a peculiar mash-up of wartime Berlin and dance club chic, military and punk.

The cast of ANDY: A POPERA elevating Sean Lally, who stars as Warhol “expert” Dr. Peter Never (Photo credit: Kate Raines Plate 3 Photography)

ANDY: A POPERA (The Bearded Ladies Cabaret): The Enigma of Warhol

A post-modern fusion of Pop art with opera, ANDY: A POPERA, a work-in-progress by the Bearded Ladies Cabaret, explores the enormous fame and legacy of Andy Warhol, with elements of both tragic opera and opera buffa. The synthesis reflects in part the ambiance of Warhol’s Factory in the Sixties.

Mary Tuomanen and Aimé Donna Kelly in WE ARE BANDITS. Image courtesy of Applied Mechanics.

WE ARE BANDITS (Applied Mechanics): People like us don’t meet

With WE ARE BANDITS, director Rebecca Wright and Applied Mechanics are working against a brutal opponent: American cynicism.

They’ve turned the third-floor space of Asian Arts Initiative into what looks like a sprawling, minimalist installation piece. Tables, chairs, and little else delineate various spaces throughout the basketball-court-sized venue, including a city square, the apartments of various characters, a rooftop, and a church.

Promotional image for ANDY: A POPERA by The Bearded Ladies Cabaret (Photo credit: Design by Flying Hand Studio, photo by Kate Raines Plate 3 Photography, Make-Up by Rebecca Kanach)

15 Questions in 15 Minutes with John Jarboe

The Bearded Ladies extend their proverbial 15 minutes of fame this week with the opening of their cabaret residency of ANDY: A POPERA in the lobby of the Wilma Theater,…

Clio (Erica Nicole Rothman, center) with her sister Muses in Mazeppa Productions’ XANADU (Photo credit: Kelly Anne Pipe Photography)

XANADU (Mazeppa Productions): A campy, aMUSEing musical

Zeus has decreed that Muses from Mount Olympus are not allowed to fall in love with mortals – that includes the Muse Clio and a boy from Venice Beach. Therein lies a story of forbidden love, gumption, and sly swipes at certain Hollywood movies — especially XANADU (Universal Pictures, 1980).