Lindsay Smiling

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Theater in Sketch: HOW TO USE A KNIFE (InterAct)

The InterAct Theater goes behind the scenes of a working kitchen

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HOW TO USE A KNIFE (InterAct): A sharp new play

Scene one is hilarious; scene two wipes the smile right off your face.

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How should Philadelphia Theatre Company rebrand itself?

Cameron Kelsall has some ideas for the new executive director.

Lindsay Smiling, Kittson O’Neill, and Samantha Bowling, Photo credit: Mark Garvin.

INFORMED CONSENT (Lantern): A strange kind of ethics

The play has a compelling point to make about the diversity of truth and mutual respect, but in the end, it’s difficult to take the argument seriously.

The rain falls at the Wilma. Photo by Matt Saunders.

WHEN THE RAIN STOPS FALLING (Wilma): How a hard rain’s a gonna fall

Using the endtimes as a backdrop, Andrew Bovell uses the drama within a family’s history as a parallel for the turbulence in humanity’s.

Jake Blouch and Claire Inie-Richards in THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA at Clark Park. Photo credit: Kyle Cassidy.

THE TWO GENTLEMAN OF VERONA (Shakespeare in Clark Park): A nice night in the park

The production, though occasionally troubled, can still put a finger on the pulse of Shakespeare at its best.

Aaron Cromie and Ian Merrill Peakes in Walnut Street Theatre’s PETER AND THE STARCATCHER (Photo credit: Mark Garvin).

PETER AND THE STARCATCHER (Walnut): A wacky look at the backstory of Peter Pan

An outstanding ensemble recounts the backstory of Peter Pan in a madcap prequel with music.

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You might be done with the past, but the past ain’t done with you: Matt Pfeiffer on O’Neill’s ANNA CHRISTIE

Matt Pfeiffer discusses the Eugene O’Neill play ahead of PAC’s reading.

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THE HARD PROBLEM (Wilma): Stoppard makes intelligible intelligence look easy

Tom Stoppard again demonstrates his uncanny ability to make dense philosophical discussions intelligible and dramatically sensible.

The 1990s called; they want their facade back.

What Can The Wilma Do With $10 Million?

A new $10 million in funds includes money for an updated facade, a cafe space, and a 10-member artistic company.

Photo by Mark Garvin.

METAMORPHOSES (Arden): A swim with the gods

This visceral production explains why humans act the way that we do, and reveres love as the most sacred of experiences.

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MOON MAN WALK (Orbiter 3): Interstellar overdrive

James Ijames’s MOON MAN WALK, the first offering by new playwrights’ collective Orbiter 3 presents a fantasy world and a very real story. And a manic pixie girl.

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Moonwalking on the Moon: Lindsay Smiling on Michael Jackson, Philly theater, and the inaugural production by Orbiter 3

This week marks a landmark in independent theater in Philadelphia: the inaugural production by Orbiter 3, a new producing playwrights collective. Over the next three years, the company will produce six…

Jered McLenigan, Ed Swidey and Keith Conallen.

ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD (Wilma): A contemporary classic, in three parts

Tom Stoppard’s ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD is perhaps the most ubiquitous work of postmodern drama.

Ross Beschler and Zainab Jah in HAMLET. Photo by Alexander Iziliaev.

HAMLET (Wilma): Blanka Zizka’s daring production amazes while keeping its distance

Not unlike the U.S. Constitution, HAMLET endures partly because its imperfections and spaces allow for different ways to read it.

Josh Carpenter (left) as Pip and Sally Mercer as Miss Havisham in the Arden Theatre Company’s GREAT EXPECTATIONS. Photo by Mark Garvin.

GREAT EXPECTATIONS (Arden): Exceeds all expectations

With a perfect combination of passion, pride, storytelling, and imagination, the Arden Theatre Company’s production of GREAT EXPECTATIONS is a thrilling night of theater.

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A NUMBER (Tiny Dynamite): A father and his son(s)

Churchill raises questions about individuality in society, the ethics of cloning, and nature vs nurture, but this is no didactic political piece.

Keith J. Conallan in DON JUAN COMES HOME FROM IRAQ, Wilma Theatre, photo by Alexander Iziliaev

DON JUAN COMES HOME FROM IRAQ (Wilma): A Disparate Jigsaw

Call it Don Juan or Don Giovanni, the Don Juan story, handed down through time, is pre-loaded with a mix of serious and comic elements and a supernatural dimension. DON JUAN COMES HOME FROM IRAQ, from theater luminaries Paula Vogel (playwright) and Banka Zizka (director), has the gravitas down and doesn’t lose sight of humor, but extra pieces lodge within this puzzle’s slippery treatment of time and reality.

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NORTH OF THE BOULEVARD (Theatre Exile): If the Boss wrote plays he’d write this one

A few years ago I was at that good used bookstore on 20th Street by the Free Library and saw a crowd gathering on the Parkway: Bruce Springsteen was about…