Lindsay Smiling

PASSAGE (Wilma): Love and death in Country X

The way to get an audience to ask itself profound questions about a work is not by asking the audience profound questions about the work.

Theater in Sketch: PASSAGE (Wilma Theater)

PASSAGE reminds sketch artist Chuck Schultz of a painting at the Philadelphia Museum by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema.

PASSING STRANGE (Wilma): Youth and rebellion

Youth is the time of our lives when the more adventurous among us follow French poet Arthur Rimbaud’s dictum that “everything we are taught is false.”

PAssing Strange Wilma Theater

PASSING STRANGE (Wilma): A worthwhile caricature of art

The performers leave a bright impression in a play that’s a caricature of life and art,

BLOOD WEDDING (Wilma): Movement in the veins

Lorca’s BLOOD WEDDING makes a fitting vehicle for the Wilma Theater in-house troupe.

Theater in Sketch: HOW TO USE A KNIFE (InterAct)

The InterAct Theater goes behind the scenes of a working kitchen

HOW TO USE A KNIFE (InterAct): A sharp new play

Scene one is hilarious; scene two wipes the smile right off your face.

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How should Philadelphia Theatre Company rebrand itself?

Cameron Kelsall has some ideas for the new executive director.

INFORMED CONSENT (Lantern): A strange kind of ethics

The play has a compelling point to make about the diversity of truth and mutual respect, but in the end, it’s difficult to take the argument seriously.

WHEN THE RAIN STOPS FALLING (Wilma): How a hard rain’s a gonna fall

Using the endtimes as a backdrop, Andrew Bovell uses the drama within a family’s history as a parallel for the turbulence in humanity’s.

THE TWO GENTLEMAN OF VERONA (Shakespeare in Clark Park): A nice night in the park

The production, though occasionally troubled, can still put a finger on the pulse of Shakespeare at its best.

Aaron Cromie and Ian Merrill Peakes in Walnut Street Theatre’s PETER AND THE STARCATCHER (Photo credit: Mark Garvin).

PETER AND THE STARCATCHER (Walnut): A wacky look at the backstory of Peter Pan

An outstanding ensemble recounts the backstory of Peter Pan in a madcap prequel with music.

You might be done with the past, but the past ain’t done with you: Matt Pfeiffer on O’Neill’s ANNA CHRISTIE

Matt Pfeiffer discusses the Eugene O’Neill play ahead of PAC’s reading.

THE HARD PROBLEM (Wilma): Stoppard makes intelligible intelligence look easy

Tom Stoppard again demonstrates his uncanny ability to make dense philosophical discussions intelligible and dramatically sensible.

What Can The Wilma Do With $10 Million?

A new $10 million in funds includes money for an updated facade, a cafe space, and a 10-member artistic company.

METAMORPHOSES (Arden): A swim with the gods

This visceral production explains why humans act the way that we do, and reveres love as the most sacred of experiences.

MOON MAN WALK (Orbiter 3): Interstellar overdrive

James Ijames’s MOON MAN WALK, the first offering by new playwrights’ collective Orbiter 3 presents a fantasy world and a very real story. And a manic pixie girl.

Moonwalking on the Moon: Lindsay Smiling on Michael Jackson, Philly theater, and the inaugural production by Orbiter 3

This week marks a landmark in independent theater in Philadelphia: the inaugural production by Orbiter 3, a new producing playwrights collective. Over the next three years, the company will produce six…

ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD (Wilma): A contemporary classic, in three parts

Tom Stoppard’s ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD is perhaps the most ubiquitous work of postmodern drama.

HAMLET (Wilma): Blanka Zizka’s daring production amazes while keeping its distance

Not unlike the U.S. Constitution, HAMLET endures partly because its imperfections and spaces allow for different ways to read it.