Bruce Graham

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Local playwright makes good: An interview with Jacqueline Goldfinger

It’s been a banner month for local playwright Jacqueline Goldfinger.

Ray Didinger (Simon Canuso Kiley) meets his boyhood hero Tommy McDonald (Ned Pryce) back in the late 1950s in TOMMY & ME. Photo by Paola Nogueras.

TOMMY & ME (Theatre Exile): Theatrical touchdown

A lovely and elegiac look at how a sportswriter developed his love for football and friendship with an Eagles quarterback.

Damon Bonetti, headshot by Christopher Kadish. (1)

Flying with BOEING BOEING Captain Damon Bonetti: An interview with the Hedgerow director

Damon Bonetti returns to Hedgerow Theatre for another summer farce.

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WHITE GUY ON THE BUS (Passage): 60-second review

Republished by kind permission from Neals Paper. Bruce Graham is having the most magnificent year of his playwriting career. His new works so far in 2016, Funnyman and WHITE GUY…

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RUMORS (BRT): 60-second review

New York City deputy mayor Charlie Brock and his wife Myra are hosting a posh party, but something is amiss.

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THE PHILLY FAN (Montgomery): The time is always ripe for a Philly sports story

Though Bruce Graham’s play is set on the eve of a potential Philadelphia sports triumph it chronicles the long-suffering, patiently impatient diehard who supports local professional teams.

3. Arden, Funnyman, KConallen, CWallnau, phto MGarvin

FUNNYMAN (Arden): Comedy on the brink of tragedy

A new play by Bruce Graham considers the sadness that often underlies comedy and the need to adapt to changing styles and the struggles of life.

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Second Acts: Top Philly playwright Bruce Graham talks FUNNYMAN and life in the theater

When you think Philadelphia theater, you think Bruce Graham. He shares his thoughts about his latest play, the state of theater in Philadelphia, and the art of writing plays.

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[book review] THE PHILADELPHIA CONNECTION: CONVERSATIONS WITH PLAYWRIGHTS, by B.J. Burton

Interviews with fifteen of Philadelphia’s noted contemporary playwrights give insights into the city’s flourishing theater community.

Frank Rizzo, 1974.

RIZZO (Theatre Exile): A romp through the Rizzo years

Return with us now to those thrilling days of yesteryear when Frank Rizzo strode the city like he owned it.

Scott Greer and Amanda Schoonover  in Bruce Graham's RIZZO from Theatre Exile. 
Photo by Paola Nogueras.

RIZZO (Theatre Exile): A big hit on the “Big Bambino”

A world-premiere production on former Mayor Frank Rizzo portrays the good and the bad of the controversial Philadelphia icon.

Tony Braithwaite and Susan Riley Stevens. Photo by Bill D'Agostino.

ACCORDING TO GOLDMAN (Act II): How to write a script

Act II opens its new season with a bang with Bruce Graham’s ACCORDING TO GOLDMAN

1. PL&TC, STELLA AND LOU, Marcia Saunders, Tom Teti, phto Mark Garvin

STELLA AND LOU (People’s Light): A middle-aged rom-com with South Philly attitude

No one captures the timbre of hometown Philadelphia better than playwright Bruce Graham, and nowhere is that more evident than in this regional premiere.

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Danny Donnelly, Chris Anthony and Anthony Marsala  in SOMETHING  INTANGIBLE.

SOMETHING INTANGIBLE (Stagecrafters): Making Mickey Mouse

The golden age of Hollywood. Bruce Graham certainly knew how to choose a snazzy setting when he wrote SOMETHING INTANGIBLE,

The ensemble (Dave Jadico, Alex Bechtel, Aimé Donna Kelly, Scott Greer, and Jennifer Childs) plays “The Spinners” in 1812 Productions’ THIS IS THE WEEK THAT IS (Photo credit: Mark Garvin)

THIS IS THE WEEK THAT IS (1812 Productions): Now a Musical and Better than Ever!

Lampooning everything from Hillary Clinton ‘not’ running for President in 2016 to NJ Governor Chris Christie ‘not’ closing the George Washington Bridge, 1812 Productions’ THIS IS THE WEEK THAT IS delivers non-stop laughs in a fast-paced ensemble-devised review of today’s important issues.

Benjamin Lloyd (on floor), Bruce Graham, David Edwards, Carl Wallnau, and George Deihl (back) in Bristol Riverside Theatre’s LAUGHTER ON THE 23rd FLOOR (Photo Credit: BRT Staff)

LAUGHTER ON THE 23rd FLOOR (Bristol Riverside Theater): The Humor and Hysteria of 1953

Neil Simon’s autobiographical comedy, LAUGHTER ON THE 23rd FLOOR, offers an intimate, insightful, and uproarious glimpse into his experiences as a junior writer for Your Show of Show—the influential TV program that ran on NBC from 1950-54, and was the first to incorporate sitcom sketches into the traditional variety-show format.

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NORTH OF THE BOULEVARD (Theatre Exile): If the Boss wrote plays he’d write this one

A few years ago I was at that good used bookstore on 20th Street by the Free Library and saw a crowd gathering on the Parkway: Bruce Springsteen was about…

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Phindie Podcast 02: Brian McCann

For the second of Phindie’s Philadelphia Independent Theater podcasts, hosts Christopher Munden and John Rosenberg talk to talented and versatile local actor Brian McCann. We talk about improv, director Matt…

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A Hollywood Wasteland: New City’s HURLYBURLY

“When shall we three meet again, in thunder, lightning or in rain? When the hurlyburly’s done, when the battle’s lost and won.” —William Shakespeare, MACBETH ARTIE: Eddie, can I ask…