Walnut Street Theatre

Reflections on Playwriting: A personal interview with Walt Vail, one of Philadelphia’s most experienced playwrights

Part two of a multi-part interview with one of Philadelphia’s oldest and most prolific playwrights.

Sixty Years of Philadelphia Theater: Interview with playwright Walt Vail

Tracing 60 years of theater history in Philadelphia through the eyes of one man.

BECOMING DR. RUTH (Walnut): 60-second review

Jane Ridley is consistently engaging in Mark St. Germain’s chatty play about the woman who became Dr. Ruth.

A CHRISTMAS STORY, THE MUSICAL (Walnut): Recollections of an unforgettable holiday

The Philadelphia debut of a popular musical is filled with humor, wonderment, and sentimental recollections of a child’s Christmas in 1940 Indiana.

SHIPWRECKED! (Walnut): A delight of theater

SHIPWRECKED! goes to the heart of storytelling. It doesn’t matter whether a tale is true or false as long as it engages and even thrills.

From the UK to Philadelphia to Broadway: An interview with actor Harry Smith

British-born actor Harry Smith talks about his background in the UK, his life and career in Philadelphia, and his upcoming debut on Broadway.

HIGH SOCIETY (Walnut): A curious Philadelphia Story

A curiously performed version of Arthur Kopit’s unnecessary rearranging and cheapening of The Philadelphia Story.

Tonight! Idiopathic Ridiculopathy Consortium kicks off the Fringe with EXIT THE KING!

Idiopathic Ridiculopathy Consortium returns with its latest dive into the absurd—Eugene Ionescos EXIT THE KING

AND THEN THERE WERE NONE (Walnut): Ten little soldier boys having lots of fun

Agatha Christie has always been a theatrical guilty pleasure, like sitting down with a nice genre book or singing along to top 40

MICKLE STREET (Walnut): Whitman and Wilde meet and then they talk

Life imitates art far more than art imitates art.

Emily Schuman, Andrew Carroll, and Heather Cole in IRC's MISALLIANCE.

MISALLIANCE (IRC): Swift, honed, talky

in a medium fraught with love stories Shaw gleefully throws dirt into our eyes and says: yours is a sick obsession.

Kathleen Wallace and Greg Wood in Noël Coward’s PRIVATE LIVES at Walnut Street Theatre. Photo by Mark Garvin.

PRIVATE LIVES (Walnut): Who is being mocked?

PRIVATE LIVES, as written by Coward, is funny because it exposes the savagery that exists beneath the polished façade of the English upper class.

A LIFE IN THE THEATRE (Walnut): 60-second review

David Mamet’s amusing A LIFE IN THE THEATRE uses the simple interplay of two actors backstage at a repertory company, to talk about life outside the theater.

MARY POPPINS (Walnut): Flying between lightness and gravitas

In doing MARY POPPINS, a director has to decide between approaches: light and fantastical like the movie or darker like the book.

9 TO 5: THE MUSICAL (Walnut Street): Performance over plot

Sharp performances keep 9 TO 5 so consistently entertaining it masks a contrived plot and mediocre music and lyrics.

Gizel Jimenez and ensemble in the Walnut's 2013 show IN THE HEIGHTS. Photo credit: Mark Garvin.

Walnut Street Theatre: Part 3, The Changing Shape of Philadelphia Theater

Katelyn Behrman’s three-part series on the Walnut Street Theatre concludes with a consideration of the Walnut’s place in the changing landscape of Philadelphia theater.

Walnut Street Theatre Studio 5.

The Walnut Street Theatre: Part 2, Crafting a Popular Season

In the second of her three-part series on the Walnut Street Theatre, Katelyn Behrman looks at how the Walnut puts together its season of popular productions, and considers the opportunities presented by the second stage and rented facilities.

The Walnut opened as a circus theater in 1809.

The Walnut Street Theatre: Part 1, The People’s Playhouse

In the first section three-part series, Kathryn Behrman sits down with Walnut artistic director Bernard Havard and other local theater folk to consider the playhouse’s commitment to popular entertainment.

Unemployment

The Ups and Downs of Success: Theater artists between jobs

“There aren’t enough cocktails to help me understand why I continue to be an actor! This shit is for the birds!”

Thus begins the Facebook entry by Joey, a dancer-actor-singer who played many roles along the U.S. east coast, but recently did not get hired for a new musical.

Erik Ransom (Photo credit: David J. Martin Photography; Warholization by Deb Miller)

Erik Ransom Takes New York by Storm!

New Jersey native Erik Ransom developed a huge following in Philadelphia with his original work COMING: A ROCK MUSICAL OF BIBLICAL PROPORTIONS, for which he wrote the book, music, and lyrics, and also starred as glam-rock protagonist Damian Salt.