Susan Riley Stevens

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COLLECTED STORIES (Act II): Friendship in the real world

As we enter the season of unpredictable weather, go to Act II to get their take on the warm and fuzzies mixed with the cold shoulder.

Donald Margulies portrait 1. Photo courtesy of South Coast Repertory
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NOISES OFF (Walnut St): Hi-jinks prevail

The chestnut sails in Frank Anzalone’s production of NOISES OFF at the Walnut Street Theatre, but not consistently.

Mary Tuomanen in HELLO! SADNESS!  Photos by  Daryl Peveto.

Two by Tuomanen: MARCUS/EMMA (InterAct) and HELLO! SADNESS (FringeArts)

Two shows by Philadelphia writer Mary Tuomanen opened on consecutive nights last week, providing a singular opportunity to assess common threads tying together works by the author.

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A NEW BRAIN (Horizon): Getting a new lease on life

Theatre Horizon’s production of William Finn’s autobiographical musical comedy is filled with off-beat humor, powerhouse vocals, and a life-affirming message.

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HARVEY (Walnut): Burns slow, then hops right along

The story is a little dated, but that is part of its charm, like watching a Norman Rockwell painting come to life.

Tony Braithwaite and Susan Riley Stevens. Photo by Bill D'Agostino.

ACCORDING TO GOLDMAN (Act II): How to write a script

Act II opens its new season with a bang with Bruce Graham’s ACCORDING TO GOLDMAN

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NORA (DTC): A riveting production of a feminist classic

Ingmar Bergman’s 1981 stage adaptation of Ibsen’s A Doll’s House is pared-down, focused, and intense. By reducing Ibsen’s original lengthy script by nearly half, Bergman endows the 19th-century feminist milestone with a post-modern clarity and import.qD

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THIS IS THE WEEK THAT IS (1812): 60-second review

With references to Throwback Thursday, Snapchat, and that annoying five-second wait to skip a YouTube video, the show focuses our attention on the funny intricacies that make up our times.

Deanna Gibson plays one of three witches in the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival’s MACBETH (Photo credit: Lee A. Butz)

MACBETH (Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival): A Minimalist Vision

Director Patrick Mulcahy takes a modernist approach to the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival’s production of MACBETH, with a 20th-century minimalist aesthetic that compels the audience to focus on the emotions and actions of the characters and the power of the playwright’s language. It’s stark and intense, and also, at times, oddly anachronistic and comical, performed in attire that suggests a peculiar mash-up of wartime Berlin and dance club chic, military and punk.