Shon Causer

the-tempest-lantern

THE TEMPEST (Lantern): Sounds and sweet airs that give delight and hurt not

Lantern Theater’s production of THE TEMPEST, Shakespeare’s last play, is an enjoyable, modest show, full of comedy and romance and the gentle spirit of human forgiveness.

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THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO THOMAS JEFFERSON, CHARLES DICKENS & COUNT LEO TOLSTOY: DISCORD (Lantern Theater Company): Locked in limbo with literati

The Lantern team transforms an essentially all-talk playscript into an engaging, living piece of theater.

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LEPER + CHIP (Inis Nua): More booze than the Bard

A fast-paced shaggy dog tale of love and revenge, told mostly in dueling monologs of Irish brogue

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FULLY COMMITTED (Horizon): A zany one-man tour-de-force

One actor plays dozens of roles in a hilarious parody of the mad scramble for reservations at a trendy restaurant in Manhattan.

2. Inis Nua, BRADLEY MANNING, JSmith, photo Katie Reing

THE RADICALISATION OF BRADLEY MANNING (Inis Nua): An unforgettable examination of a critical American subject

An intense and impactful bio-play on Bradley Manning makes its powerful American debut in a stellar production by Inis Nua.

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Chatting with the Lantern’s Charles McMahon about his new play on Oscar Wilde

Charles McMahon discusses the inspiration, themes, and format of his new play on Oscar Wilde, prior to its world premiere with Lantern Theater Company.

Bi Jean Ngo, Greg Wood, David Bradley Johnson in SHIPWRECKED! (Photo credit: Walnut Street Theatre)

SHIPWRECKED! (Walnut): A delight of theater

SHIPWRECKED! goes to the heart of storytelling. It doesn’t matter whether a tale is true or false as long as it engages and even thrills.

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PHOTOGRAPH 51 (Lantern): Discovering the secret of life

The backstory of Rosalind Franklin’s seminal image that led to the discovery of the double-helix structure of the DNA molecule is examined in an engrossing Philadelphia premiere.

Ben Dibble in DOUBT. Photo by Mark Garvin.

DOUBT: A Parable (Lantern): Some things are certain

It may be daunting for theaters to produce the original theatrical source for a well-regarded movie, but Lantern Theater Company’s DOUBT shows why some plays are worth reclaiming for the stage.

Walnut Street Theatre, Arsenic and Old Lace, Damon Bonetti and Jennie Eisenhower

ARSENIC AND OLD LACE (Walnut Street Theatre): Macabre Madcap Comedy Classic

The historic Walnut Street Theatre celebrates two milestones with its mainstage presentation of ARSENIC AND OLD LACE, written by New York playwright Joseph Kesselring in 1939: the play’s 75th anniversary and its own 205th landmark season. Directed by Charles Abbott, the Walnut Street’s crackerjack production (in association with Fulton Theatre in Lancaster, PA) whips up the perfect concoction of murder, mayhem, and misplaced “mercy,” topped with a large dollop of macabre madness, in this delectable recipe for hilarity.

Jered McLenigan as Marc Antony (Photo courtesy of Mark Garvin)

JULIUS CAESAR (Lantern): Political persuasion in feudal Japan

If William Shakespeare was alive today he’d be a …. well, he’d probably be a poet and playwright, but he’d also make a damn good political speechwriter. The crux of his JULIUS CAESAR, now in an accessible production by Lantern Theater Company, comes in a speech following the title character’s assassination.

Charlie DelMarcelle, Geneviève Perrier, Amy Smith, and Doug Hara in the Lantern’s A CHILD’S CHRISTMAS IN WALES (Photo credit: Mark Garvin)

A CHILD’S CHRISTMAS IN WALES (Lantern): Idyllic visions of a holiday past

Lantern Theater Company’s world premiere adaptation of A CHILD’S CHRISTMAS IN WALES by Charles McMahon and Sebastienne Mundheim, the inventive “interdisciplinary performance-maker” who designed the production and also directs, captures all the warmth, nostalgia, and childlike wonder of the original, employing live actors, puppets, miniature houses, plastic-bag clouds, and exhilarating snow flurries to transform Thomas’s descriptive language and idealized memories into an enchanting theatrical vision.

Christopher Sutton as Buddy, with a supporting ensemble of elves, in the Walnut Street Theatre’s ELF (Photo credit: Mark Garvin)

ELF (Walnut): A family-friendly feel-good musical for the holidays

Based on the 2003 hit film of the same name, ELF, this year’s annual Christmas-time extravaganza at the Walnut Street Theatre, offers popular feel-good entertainment for the whole family. The amusing musical comedy is filled with magic and spectacle for the kids, wry jokes and innuendo for their grown-ups, and a familiar sentimental moral that is relevant for all ages. It’s a cute and snappy start to the holiday theater season that could make even the meanest Grinch smile.

Megan Bellwoar (standing) and Mary Martello (seated) as Maureen and Mag Folan in Lantern Theater Company’s production of Martin McDonagh’s THE BEAUTY QUEEN OF LEENANE. Photo by Mark Garvin.

A Darker Emerald Isle: Lantern’s THE BEAUTY QUEEN OF LEENANE

The Lantern Theater Company’s production of THE BEAUTY QUEEN OF LEENANE completes its presentation of Martin McDonagh’s Leenane Trilogy, following 2007’s THE LONESOME WEST and 2011’s A SKULL IN CONNEMARA….