philadelphia theater reviews

Phindie regularly publishes Philadelphia theater reviews and articles on the performing arts in Philadelphia.

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SIDE SHOW (Media Theatre): Coming together on a small stage

SIDE SHOW is a tricky piece, but there was much to savor at Media Theatre’s production

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CORIOLANUS (Lantern): Succeeding with a Shakespeare many companies wouldn’t attempt

With a strong cast and design wizards the Lantern has made CORIOLANUS a visceral, lively and thought-provoking experience

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IT’S SO LEARNING (Berserker Residents): Will this be on the test?

The Berserker Residents take us back to school

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AN ADULT EVENING OF SHEL SILVERSTEIN (Allens Lane): Our ridiculous grown up world

From the author of such children’s classics as The Giving Tree and Where the Sidewalk Ends comes a socially insightful series of vignettes

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LOST GIRLS (Theatre Exile): We are all capable of redemption

Yes, that was me sobbing on opening night of LOST GIRLS.

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LEPER + CHIP (Inis Nua): More booze than the Bard

A fast-paced shaggy dog tale of love and revenge, told mostly in dueling monologs of Irish brogue

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WAITING FOR GODOT (Curio): Highlighting the hilarity of Beckett’s classic

Curio’s designers have created a bubble of no time, no place, in which anything or nothing can happen.

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Theater in Sketch: THE ENCHANTED (IRC) and A DOLL’S HOUSE (Swarthmore)

Comparinge the absurdist comedy of Giraudoux with the serious drama of Ibsen.

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THE ENCHANTED (IRC): a great revival speaks to our times

Philly’s favorite absurdist company Idiopathic Ridiculopathy Consortium revives Jean Giraudoux’s THE ENCHANTED.

Carla Belver, Kevin Meehan and Nancy Boykin in JOHN by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Annie Baker. Running at Arden Theatre Company through February 26. Photo by Mark Garvin.

JOHN (Arden): Things that haunt

There remains something compelling about ghost stories. Annie Baker’s JOHN demonstrates why: our past haunts just as well as any poltergeist.

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LAUGHTER ON THE 23RD FLOOR (Walnut): Funny, morbid, timely, and of a time

Theatergoers who long for the good ol’ days of pre-political correctness will love it. Everyone else, just enjoy the ride.

Mary Tuomanen in HELLO! SADNESS!  Photos by  Daryl Peveto.

Two by Tuomanen: MARCUS/EMMA (InterAct) and HELLO! SADNESS (FringeArts)

Two shows by Philadelphia writer Mary Tuomanen opened on consecutive nights last week, providing a singular opportunity to assess common threads tying together works by the author.

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CONSTELLATIONS (Wilma): Love in the multiverse

“We have all the time we ever had.”

Lindsay Smiling, Kittson O’Neill, and Samantha Bowling, Photo credit: Mark Garvin.

INFORMED CONSENT (Lantern): A strange kind of ethics

The play has a compelling point to make about the diversity of truth and mutual respect, but in the end, it’s difficult to take the argument seriously.

Akeem Davis as Bartram. Photo by Ashley LaBonde, Wide Eyed Studios.

ALL’S WELL THAT ENDS WELL (PAC): A mingled web well woven

PAC’s current production confirms its reputation as the best adaptor of classic works.

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A YEAR WITH FROG AND TOAD (Arden Children’s Theatre): Another year with frog and toad

The simple tricks of the stage awe an audience of CGI-era children, showing that even something as normal as friendship can be magic.

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Theater in Sketch: ALL’S WELL THAT ENDS WELL (PAC)

Sketches of William Shakespeare’s ALL’S WELL THAT ENDS WELL from Philadelphia Artists’ Collective.

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Just one asshole with an opinion: theater critic Mark Cofta on the art of reviewing and observations on Philly’s theater scene

Originally published on the FringeArts blog. Republished with kind permission. “I see 150 to 180 plays a year, and still always regret missing a bunch.” Mark Cofta has been covering…