Neil Simon

Touchtones

TOUCHTONES (Arden): This must be a bad connection

Naughty and nice collide in TOUCHTONES, a musical fantasy in world premiere at the Arden.

brighton-beach-act-ii-review

BRIGHTON BEACH MEMOIRS (Act II Playhouse): The same old schtick

A play for people who need to be told how to feel.

LaughterPress1

LAUGHTER ON THE 23RD FLOOR (Walnut): Funny, morbid, timely, and of a time

Theatergoers who long for the good ol’ days of pre-political correctness will love it. Everyone else, just enjoy the ride.

rumors

RUMORS (Allens Lane Theater): 60-second review

Noel Hanley’s masterful treatment of Neil Simon’s RUMORS exemplifies a farce done right.

bristol-riverside-rumors

RUMORS (BRT): 60-second review

New York City deputy mayor Charlie Brock and his wife Myra are hosting a posh party, but something is amiss.

Paul Meshejian, PlayPenn 4

PlayPenn, Theater, and “A comfortable place for misfits”: Interview with founder Paul Meshejian, Part 1

It’s unfashionable to suggest there’s such a thing as human nature, but we are “Homo narrans”—Man, the story teller. The theater will always be with us—as a sacred space.

1. PL&TC, BILOXI BLUES, JMLambert, photo MGarvin

BILOXI BLUES (People’s Light): Coming of age in WWII

Though entertaining as a comedy, BILOXI BLUES contains an important message about fighting “the good war” abroad, while many struggles against injustice remain on the home front.

JoeySlotnick_MichaelNathanson2

CHAPTER TWO (Bucks County Playhouse): 60-second review

Directed by Marsha Mason, the actress in the original film adaptation, Neil Simon’s CHAPTER TWO is a romantic comedy/drama in the spirit of the Hotel Suite.

Benjamin Lloyd (on floor), Bruce Graham, David Edwards, Carl Wallnau, and George Deihl (back) in Bristol Riverside Theatre’s LAUGHTER ON THE 23rd FLOOR (Photo Credit: BRT Staff)

LAUGHTER ON THE 23rd FLOOR (Bristol Riverside Theater): The Humor and Hysteria of 1953

Neil Simon’s autobiographical comedy, LAUGHTER ON THE 23rd FLOOR, offers an intimate, insightful, and uproarious glimpse into his experiences as a junior writer for Your Show of Show—the influential TV program that ran on NBC from 1950-54, and was the first to incorporate sitcom sketches into the traditional variety-show format.