Michelle Pauls

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Six Questions for Six Directors: John O’Hara’s 12 CHAIRS gets a revamped production

Female-centric theater group ReVamp Collective presents 12 CHAIRS.

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DEATH IS A CABARET OL’ CHUM: A GRAVEYARD CABARET (REV Theatre Company): 2016 Fringe review 94

REV Theatre Company let loose a quirky combo of fright-night-meets-kickline-cabaret for this year’s Fringe.

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THE PLOUGH AND THE STARS (Irish Heritage): Human portraits of a bloody struggle

Dives into the lives of Irish tenement dwellers at the time of the 1916 Easter Rising

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Ireland Rising: Irish Heritage Theatre actors respond to THE PLOUGH AND THE STARS

Nine Irish Heritage Theatre actors talk about the Irish roots of Sean O’Casey’s THE PLOUGH AND THE STARS.

Upcoming Readings

  What: How Green Was My Valley with music by Roger Ames and book and lyrics by Elizabeth Bassine; The Gig with music, book, and lyrics by Doug Cohen; and A Good Man with music by…

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2016 is almost knocking at the gate: Interview with LAFFERTY’S WAKE playwright Susan Turlish

In this, the second of a two-part interview (read part one here), Henrik Eger talks to playwright Susan Turlish about her work.

Illustration of Luna Theater's ANIMAL FARM by Mike Jackson. alrightmike.com.

ANIMAL FARM (Luna): From pig to (wo)man, and from (wo)man to pig

Impressive theatricality in an imperfect production of Orwell’s allegory of the Russian Revolution and Stalin’s real-life dystopia.

Illicit lovers Jacques (Chase Byrd) and Francoise (Felicia Leicht) resist temptation, Photo by Ashley LaBonde and Wide Eyed Studios (3)

THE CAPTIVE (PAC): 2015 Fringe review 5

Although it has lost the shock value (lesbianism!) it had in the 1920s, it is easy to see why PAC were attracted to this forgotten play.

Daniel Student contemplates his SoLow piece, The Daniel Student Gay Porn Viewing Party. Photo by Sarah R. Bloom.

Brightening Up SoLow Fest: Bright Invention takes over this year’s festival with nine original shows

Nearly a quarter of the works in this year’s SoLow Fest come from one company: Bright Invention.

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That’s Just Like Your Opinion, Man: RAW ONION REVIVAL (IRC) actors become their own critics

Every actor has experienced theater critics who got things a little wrong. Here’s their chance to peel their own onion.

Stephen Fala and Tori Mittelman as Patrick and Maggie Clancy in LAFFERTY’S WAKE at Society Hill Playhouse (Photo credit: Michelle Pauls)

LAFFERTY’S WAKE (Society Hill Playhouse): “For God’s sake, you got to laugh a little!”

Society Hill Playhouse celebrates St. Patrick’s Day with a seasonal revival of Susan Turlish’s musical-comedy send-up of the Irish,

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Irish Eyes Still Smiling: LAFFERTY’S WAKE back at Society Hill Playhouse 17 years later

In 1997, Inquirer theater critic Douglas J. Keating attended the world premiere of LAFFERTY’S WAKE, an interactive Irish-style play conceived by Susan Turlish and her cast of local actors.

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TIL DIVORCE DO US PART: THE MUSICAL (Society Hill Playhouse): The annoying ex you never wanted to see

This 90-minute cabaret featuring of three bitter divorced women and a newspaper pen pal crams heartless bubble gum jingles and cheap laughs into the plot of a confused Lifetime special.

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LIVING IN EXILE: A RETELLING OF THE ILIAD (Philadelphia Experimental Theatre Ensemble): Fringe Review 68

LIVING IN EXILE presents a compelling reinterpretation of the Trojan War; playwright Jon Lipsky’s script draws directly upon the Homeric tradition of oral recitation.

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Fringe interview with Michelle Pauls: LIVING IN EXILE and the early days of the Fringe

Now in its 18th year, the Philadelphia Fringe Festival has changed a lot since its early days. Once a small weeklong Old City event, with shows and happenings across the…

K. O. DelMarcelle and Gina Martino in THE TOUGHEST BOY IN PHILADELPHIA.

THE TOUGHEST BOY IN PHILADELPHIA (Iron Age Theatre): Gender confusion

While THE TOUGHEST BOY IN PHILADELPHIA has something important to say, the material is arranged so carelessly that I’ll be damned if I can tell you what it is.

Brooke Fitzgerald, Katherine Perry and Cindy Spitko in Ed Swidey's mEEp.

The Return of the mEEps (White Pines)

Ed Swidey’s mEEps return for a one-night only show at White Pines place in Elkins Park, May 9, 2014.

Gina Martino (Shelly) and Luke Moyer (Bradley) in Iron Age Theatre’s BURIED CHILD (Photo credit: Randall Wise)

BURIED CHILD (Iron Age): Decay and Dysfunction in America’s Heartland

From the moment you arrive, Iron Age Theatre’s production of Sam Shepard’s BURIED CHILD, directed and designed by John Doyle and Randall Wise, thrusts you into a deeply disturbing world of grime, decay, and depression. Mounds of barren dirt, wood chips, and dried-out stalks surround and invade a tumbledown farmhouse with a rusted old mailbox that hasn’t seen a delivery in years. Inside, a filthy stained sofa with torn-up upholstery and torn-out stuffing is held together by black duct tape, as huge gaps between the rough-hewn wall slats let in the pouring rain and dreary darkness of a relentless storm.

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You’re Probably Missing Out: A tour of Kensington’s performance spaces

The performance spaces which have made Kensington their home (Walking Fish Theatre, Hella Fresh, Mascher Space, and fidgetspace) are remote, both financially and physically, from the city, yet still close enough to converse artistically with downtown venues and even to attract funding.

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AMERICAN FAIRY TALES (Walking Fish): Riotous fairy tales at Walking Fish

AMERICAN FAIRY TALES is a kids’ show, adapted by co-artistic director Stan Heleva from L. Frank Baum’s short stories with a generous amount of modernization and localization. This is fast and messy theater making, thriving on audience involvement. The story doesn’t matter as much as the laughs, and the more we shouted along, and the more sassy little Benjamin in the front row jeered and challenged the actors, the more engaged they, and we, became.