Michael Hahn

Peter DeLaurier in AN ILIAD at Lantern Theater Company. Photo by Mark Garvin.

AN ILIAD (Lantern): Homer sweet homer

AN ILIAD brings Homer’s characters and their epic struggle to life using just a sole narrator and musical accompaniment.

4. Lantern, AS YOU LIKE IT, Liz Filios, Jake Blouch, photo Mark Garvin

AS YOU LIKE IT (Lantern): As you’ve never seen it!

A cross-temporal interpretation of Shakespeare’s Elizabethan classic injects passages of current expressions and gestures, slapstick, and original music into the well-known pastoral rom-com.

Tony Braithwaite and Susan Riley Stevens. Photo by Bill D'Agostino.

ACCORDING TO GOLDMAN (Act II): How to write a script

Act II opens its new season with a bang with Bruce Graham’s ACCORDING TO GOLDMAN

Christopher Patrick Mullen as Merlyn and Susan McKey as Archimedes in ARTHUR AND THE TALE OF THE RED DRAGON at People’s Light (Photo caption: Mark Garvin)

ARTHUR AND THE TALE OF THE RED DRAGON: A MUSICAL PANTO (People’s Light): Coming of age in the Middle Ages

The family friendly holiday panto takes a wacky look at the growing pains of the future King Arthur as he faces the challenges of life, learning, and leadership.

Jennifer Childs and Tony Lawton star as Celia and Toby Teasdale in 1812 Productions’ INTIMATE EXCHANGES (Photo credit: Mark Garvin)

Intimate Exchanges (1812 Productions): Fringe Review 1.2

What makes film different from theater is that film is fixed forever, performances and lines repeating endlessly year after year, while theater has the ability to surprise us. And what makes theater different from life is that theater is scripted and life is random, unexpected, not planned out ahead of time. And what makes Philadelphia’s FringeArts Festival fun is that it delights in performances that confound expectations.

Jennifer Childs as Sylvie Bell and Tony Lawton as Lionel Hepplewick in 1812’s INTIMATE EXCHANGES (Photo credit: Mark Garvin)

INTIMATE EXCHANGES (1812 Productions): Fringe Review 1.1

Alan Ayckbourn’s inventive rom-com about failing and budding mid-life relationships in suburban London is that the play (or more accurately, the first volume of the playwright’s original two-volume work that is performed here) offers sixteen plot options and eight different endings. And for the first time in its production history, 1812 shines the spotlight on random members of the audience to decide spontaneously which path the characters should take as they reach a series of crossroads in their lives.

The ensemble of Delaware Shakespeare Festival’s HAMLET (Photo credit: Alessandra Nicole)

HAMLET (Delaware Shakespeare Festival): “’Fore God, my lord, well spoken . . .”

While “Something is rotten in the state of Denmark,” something is wonderful in the state of Delaware! With its unsurpassed examination of the human condition, profound emotions, and exquisitely beautiful language, HAMLET is considered by many (myself among them) to be the world’s greatest play by the world’s greatest playwright.