Merián Soto

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SUPPER, PEOPLE ON THE MOVE (Cardell): A topic tackled with great success

Supper, People on the Move was a well thought out and efficaciously executed choreographic project that called for us to carefully examine the paths people take to conquer new horizons.

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Supper, People on the Move: The Physicality of Migration

Supper, People on the Move reveals the traces of migration on the body. The dancers explore the layered and physical experiences of immigration.

photo by Bill Hebert

Temple University Dance Faculty Concert: Branches, boxing rings, and the boldly political

Temple’s faculty show featured works by current dance faculty and guest artist Andrea Miller of Gallim Dance

Photo courtesy of National Water Dance

The National Water Dance

A typical concert dance performance does not usually conjure up thoughts of social justice and governmental reform. At first glance, dance and politics might not seem to go together. That is not to say that the art form is entirely apolitical – different genres of art can certainly serve as a persuasive medium for declaring political statements. From a historical perspective, analysis of the arts can be used to study social change and political reform, and dance is no exception to this.