Meghan Jones

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MICHAEL & EDIE (Villanova Theater): 60-second review

It’s more than the classic boy meets girl, boy likes girl, girl is cold to boy tale:. Rachel Bonds’s MICHAEL & EDIE is a whirlwind of realization, emotion, and introspection.

Corinna Burns in Inis Nua’s LONG LIVE THE LITTLE KNIFE (Photo credit: Katie Reing)

LONG LIVE THE LITTLE KNIFE (Inis Nua): A delightfully duplicitous foray into the art(s) of deception

What do art forgers and the theater have in common? Both try to convince you that something is real when it’s not, and both do it with the expectation of…

Clare Mahoney and Peter DeLaurier in Lantern Theater Company's QED (Photo credit: Mark Garvin).

QED (Lantern) No doctorate in theoretical physics is required to enjoy this production

But you don’t have to be an egghead to enjoy this play. It’s a great show for non-physicists, a category that includes a whole lot of us.

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ARCADIA (Lantern): A great play is always timely

Stoppard’s genius is to permeate his play with deep philosophical contemplation while using the play to explore those same issues.

Jered McLenigan as Marc Antony (Photo courtesy of Mark Garvin)

JULIUS CAESAR (Lantern): Political persuasion in feudal Japan

If William Shakespeare was alive today he’d be a …. well, he’d probably be a poet and playwright, but he’d also make a damn good political speechwriter. The crux of his JULIUS CAESAR, now in an accessible production by Lantern Theater Company, comes in a speech following the title character’s assassination.

Joe Guzmán and Forrest McClendon in THE TRAGEDY OF JULIUS CAESAR at the Lantern, with set design by Meghan Jones (Photo credit: Mark Garvin)

On the Universality of Shakespeare: Roman History through a Shoji Screen in the Lantern’s THE TRAGEDY OF JULIUS CAESAR

Director Charles McMahon, founding artistic director of the Lantern Theater Company, asserts that all of Shakespeare’s plays, whenever or wherever they’re set, are in fact observations about contemporary England. By shifting the locales to places outside of his homeland.

Adam Altman and Clare Mahoney in Inis Nua's BLINK.

BLINK (Inis Nua): The Manufacturing of Affection

Phil Porter’s BLINK—making its American premiere with Inis Nua Theatre—is a touching pastiche of romance, high drama and farce. It’s both heavy and light, comic and tragic, whimsical and earthbound—yet…