Matt Tallman

THE PRISONER OF ZENDA (Hedgerow Theatre): 60-second review

A sense of familiarity permeates THE PRISONER OF ZENDA, Matt Tallman’s adaptation of Anthony Hope’s novel of intrigue, adventure, and mistaken identity

Emotion is the Heart of Melodrama: Adapting THE PRISONER OF ZENDA

“It’s easier to fix than to create,” says director and adapter Matt Tallman of Anthony Hope’s THE PRISONER OF ZENDA running March 30 to April 30 at the historic Hedgerow…

THE SISTERHOOD (Mauckingbird): Queering Moliere

It doesn’t take a Moliere scholar to enjoy these zany characters, brilliantly brought to life by the ensemble.

THE SISTERHOOD (MAUCKINGBIRD): A delightful hi-brow comedy skewers hi-brow pretensions

While some plays are heavy three course meals, THE SISTERHOOD is definitely dessert.

Is It Always About Sex? Director Kittson O’Neill on the sexual politics of THE ROVER

If you don’t think every play is about sex, you shouldn’t be making theater.

THE TAMING OF THE SHREW (Lantern): Capturing the passion and the parody

Director Charles McMahon equates the hot-blooded battle of wills between Kate and Petruchio with the intense, sensual, and stylized dance of the tango.

Richard II (Quintessence): Let us sit on the ground and tell sad stories of the death of kings

RICHARD II is a richly rewarding play, full of insightful and startling verse, but you might want to read a synopsis before seeing this production.

Carlo Campbell, Ryan Walter (as Audrey), Sean Close (as Touchstone), Lee Cortopassi (as Amiens). (Photo by Shawn May)

AS YOU LIKE IT (Quintessence): Do you not know I am a woman?

Burns and his cast humanize Shakespeare’s characters and provide a smart, jolly time that is tinged with genuine sentiment.

Maria Konstantinidis stars as Aldonza/Dulcinea in Act II Playhouse's production of "Man of La Mancha," now playing through June 8, 2014. Photo by Bill D'Agostino.

MAN OF LA MANCHA (Act II): 60-second review

MAN OF LA MANCHA is a play within a play. The production is the clear result of what happens when a group of professionals pour their talents into a common goal.

JULIUS CAESAR (Lantern): Political persuasion in feudal Japan

If William Shakespeare was alive today he’d be a …. well, he’d probably be a poet and playwright, but he’d also make a damn good political speechwriter. The crux of his JULIUS CAESAR, now in an accessible production by Lantern Theater Company, comes in a speech following the title character’s assassination.