Lantern Theater Company

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THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES (Lantern): 60-second review

The adaptation appropriates the ludicrous plot points and outlandish characters in Arthur Conan Doyle’s opus for a fast and fun theatrical comedy.

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A Reversal of Roles for KC MacMillan: The director speaks to Phindie about her return to acting in THE FAIR MAID OF THE WEST (PAC)

Known to everyone in the Philadelphia theater community as a director, dramaturg, and associate artistic director of Lantern Theater Company, KC MacMillan is now adding actor to her list of professional…

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THE TAMING OF THE SHREW (Lantern): Capturing the passion and the parody

Director Charles McMahon equates the hot-blooded battle of wills between Kate and Petruchio with the intense, sensual, and stylized dance of the tango.

J Hernandez as Iago in The Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre’s Othello, 2013 (Photo credit: Chris Miller)

J Hernandez: Feeling the Love in Philadelphia!

J Hernandez has been a constant presence on Philadelphia stages his acclaimed portrayal of Iago in a 2013 production of Othello. Phindie spoke to the Texas native about relocating, being a Latino actor, and why he loves Philly theater.

Ben Dibble in DOUBT. Photo by Mark Garvin.

DOUBT: A Parable (Lantern): Some things are certain

It may be daunting for theaters to produce the original theatrical source for a well-regarded movie, but Lantern Theater Company’s DOUBT shows why some plays are worth reclaiming for the stage.

Clare Mahoney and Peter DeLaurier in Lantern Theater Company's QED (Photo credit: Mark Garvin).

QED (Lantern) No doctorate in theoretical physics is required to enjoy this production

But you don’t have to be an egghead to enjoy this play. It’s a great show for non-physicists, a category that includes a whole lot of us.

Peter DeLaurier (with Clare Mahoney in the background) in Lantern Theater Company's QED (Photo credit: Mark Garvin).

QED (Lantern): A glowing tribute to a brilliant man

Peter DeLaurier reprises his role as physicist Richard Feynman in Lantern Theater Company’s remount of its 2006 hit.

Bradley K. Wrenn as Ezra Chater and Nathan Foley as Captain Brice in Lantern Theater Company's production of ARCADIA. Photo by Mark Garvin.

“The Experiment”, conclusion: ARCADIA (Lantern)

Michael Fisher concludes his multi-part review experiment of ARCADIA at the Lantern Theater Company. Was it a success?

Daniel Fredrick as Valentine Coverly with toroise in Lantern Theater Company's production of ARCADIA. Photo by Mark Garvin.

“The Experiment”, part 3: ARCADIA (Lantern)

Michael Fisher continues his multi-part critical consideration of the Lantern Theater Company’s ARCADIA.

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The winners of the 2014 Barrymore Awards…

From about 100 entries, winners in twenty-two categories were selected by a panel of twelve judges and announced at the Barrymore Awards ceremony tonight. InterAct Theatre’s Down Past Passyunk won top…

Charlotte Northeast, Maxwell Eddy, Alex Boyle  in ARCADIA (Photo: Mark Garvin)

“The Experiment”, part 2: ARCADIA (Lantern)

Part 2 of Michael Fisher’s multi-part, multi-week consideration of ARCADIA at the Lantern.

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“The Experiment”, part 1: ARCADIA (Lantern)

Part One of Michael Fisher’s multi-part critical experiment, reviewing the Lantern Theater Company’s production of ARCADIA several times over its run.

Photo by Kim Carson.

“The Experiment”: ARCADIA (Lantern), Introduction to an experiment in criticism

Phindie writer Michael Fisher introduces his multi-part critical experiment, using the Lantern’s production of ARCADIA as his guinea pig subject.

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ARCADIA (Lantern): A great play is always timely

Stoppard’s genius is to permeate his play with deep philosophical contemplation while using the play to explore those same issues.

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2013/14 Critics’ Awards: The best in Philadelphia theater

For the second year, Phindie asked local theater writers to vote on the best theatrical work produced in or near the city in the 2013/14 theater season.

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The fault, dear Brutus, Act III: Makoto Hirano interviews Lantern AD Charles McMahon about “Super Racist” Julius Caesar

Makoto Hirano asks Lantern artistic director Charles McMahon some tough questions about the “Super Racist” Julius Caesar. And a clearly contrite McMahon does his best to explain the process that lead to the company’s misguided choices.

Lantern Theater Company The Train Driver review

THE TRAIN DRIVER (Lantern): A haunting look across the tracks

There’s something haunting Roelf (Peter DeLaurier) in the Lantern Theater Company’s atmospheric production of Athol Fugard’s THE TRAIN DRIVER. Disturbed by the memory of a young woman and baby “pulverized”…

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Is there money in theater? Where does it come from? Who gets it?

Phindie looks at tax returns for local theaters to see how much they brought in from what sources. We also look at who the best paid employee was for each “non-profit”.

The Lantern joins a rich tradition: James Bond gives a lesson in cultural sensitivity in "You Only Live Twice".

The fault, dear Brutus, Act II: Interview with Makoto Hirano about “Super Racist” Julius Caesar

You may have seen the Lantern Theater Company’s JULIUS CAESAR, which recast Shakespeare’s political tragedy in Feudal Japan. You may also have seen the open letter that local playwright and performer Makoto Hirano hand-delivered to The Lantern on “How to Stage Your Show Without Being Super Racist,” which he signed “Makoto Hirano, Dance-theatre artist, actual Japanese person, and actual Samurai descendent,” reposted on Phindie with Hirano’s consent.

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The fault, dear Brutus, is Super Racism: Makoto Hirano Criticizes Lantern’s Julius Caesar

“Will it be in yellow face,” my friend asked when I told him about Lantern Theater Company’s decision to stage Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar in feudal Japan, when what the meant was “in kimonos with some Japanese screens and music” seemed somehow culturally tone deaf.