Lance Kniskern

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THE TEMPEST (Lantern): Sounds and sweet airs that give delight and hurt not

Lantern Theater’s production of THE TEMPEST, Shakespeare’s last play, is an enjoyable, modest show, full of comedy and romance and the gentle spirit of human forgiveness.

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THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO THOMAS JEFFERSON, CHARLES DICKENS & COUNT LEO TOLSTOY: DISCORD (Lantern Theater Company): Locked in limbo with literati

The Lantern team transforms an essentially all-talk playscript into an engaging, living piece of theater.

Lindsay Smiling, Kittson O’Neill, and Samantha Bowling, Photo credit: Mark Garvin.

INFORMED CONSENT (Lantern): A strange kind of ethics

The play has a compelling point to make about the diversity of truth and mutual respect, but in the end, it’s difficult to take the argument seriously.

Jake Blouch and Claire Inie-Richards in THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA at Clark Park. Photo credit: Kyle Cassidy.

THE TWO GENTLEMAN OF VERONA (Shakespeare in Clark Park): A nice night in the park

The production, though occasionally troubled, can still put a finger on the pulse of Shakespeare at its best.

Jennifer Childs as Abbey

I WILL NOT GO GENTLY (1812): Rage, rage against the dying of the light

The production keeps audience members of all ages laughing with outrageous and suggestive songs by Jennifer Childs and Christopher Colucci.

Marc LeVasseur as Oscar Wilde. Photo by Mark Garvin.

OSCAR WILDE: FROM THE DEPTHS (Lantern): A love that dared not speak its mind

With his brilliant work and tragic arc, Oscar Wilde remains a fascinating figure.

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Chatting with the Lantern’s Charles McMahon about his new play on Oscar Wilde

Charles McMahon discusses the inspiration, themes, and format of his new play on Oscar Wilde, prior to its world premiere with Lantern Theater Company.

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THE TAMING OF THE SHREW (Lantern): Capturing the passion and the parody

Director Charles McMahon equates the hot-blooded battle of wills between Kate and Petruchio with the intense, sensual, and stylized dance of the tango.

Ben Dibble in DOUBT. Photo by Mark Garvin.

DOUBT: A Parable (Lantern): Some things are certain

It may be daunting for theaters to produce the original theatrical source for a well-regarded movie, but Lantern Theater Company’s DOUBT shows why some plays are worth reclaiming for the stage.

Jennifer Childs and Tony Lawton star as Celia and Toby Teasdale in 1812 Productions’ INTIMATE EXCHANGES (Photo credit: Mark Garvin)

Intimate Exchanges (1812 Productions): Fringe Review 1.2

What makes film different from theater is that film is fixed forever, performances and lines repeating endlessly year after year, while theater has the ability to surprise us. And what makes theater different from life is that theater is scripted and life is random, unexpected, not planned out ahead of time. And what makes Philadelphia’s FringeArts Festival fun is that it delights in performances that confound expectations.

Jennifer Childs as Sylvie Bell and Tony Lawton as Lionel Hepplewick in 1812’s INTIMATE EXCHANGES (Photo credit: Mark Garvin)

INTIMATE EXCHANGES (1812 Productions): Fringe Review 1.1

Alan Ayckbourn’s inventive rom-com about failing and budding mid-life relationships in suburban London is that the play (or more accurately, the first volume of the playwright’s original two-volume work that is performed here) offers sixteen plot options and eight different endings. And for the first time in its production history, 1812 shines the spotlight on random members of the audience to decide spontaneously which path the characters should take as they reach a series of crossroads in their lives.

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THE SCREWTAPE LETTTERS (Lantern): 60-second review

The Lantern Theater Company’s remount of THE SCREWTAPE LETTERS by C.S. Lewis is a sizzling show from hell. Kathryn Osenlund’s 60-second review

Lantern Theater Company The Train Driver review

THE TRAIN DRIVER (Lantern): A haunting look across the tracks

There’s something haunting Roelf (Peter DeLaurier) in the Lantern Theater Company’s atmospheric production of Athol Fugard’s THE TRAIN DRIVER. Disturbed by the memory of a young woman and baby “pulverized”…

1812 Productions THE BIG TIME review

THE BIG TIME: NEW VAUDEVILLE FOR THE HOLIDAYS (1812): Juggling seasonal laughs

Vaudeville has returned in all its glory with 1812’s THE BIG TIME: NEW VAUDEVILLE FOR THE HOLIDAYS. Pratfalls, double entendres, and caricatures of people past and present light up the…