Kathryn MacMillan

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A Woman Who Dares: Interview with KC MacMillan

KC MacMillan talks about making the transition from freelance artist to administrative director, what she envisions for the next phase of her career, and what advice she has for young women who aspire to direct in Philadelphia

Lindsay Smiling, Kittson O’Neill, and Samantha Bowling, Photo credit: Mark Garvin.

INFORMED CONSENT (Lantern): A strange kind of ethics

The play has a compelling point to make about the diversity of truth and mutual respect, but in the end, it’s difficult to take the argument seriously.

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GROUNDED (InterAct): The killing screens

GROUNDED is a tale for our times: war is most hellish when it resembles office life, reality is most profound rendered in pixels.

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Drone Warfare Hits Home: Kittson O’Neill on InterAct’s GROUNDED

Kittson O’Neill plays a fighter pilot and expectant mother living in a desert suburb in the U.S. Southwest, controlling weapons which kill people in a distant foreign desert.

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MRS. WARREN’S PROFESSION (Lantern): Thought-provoking amusement

In a Philadelphia theater season with an auspicious beginning, this production of MRS. WARREN’S PROFESSION might be the most auspicious of all.

Jake Blouch and Claire Inie-Richards in THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA at Clark Park. Photo credit: Kyle Cassidy.

THE TWO GENTLEMAN OF VERONA (Shakespeare in Clark Park): A nice night in the park

The production, though occasionally troubled, can still put a finger on the pulse of Shakespeare at its best.

Hokusai's Wave print from the 36 Views series.

In Conversation: Lantern’s panel discussion explores the themes of 36 VIEWS

A panel discussion on “Art-World Movers and Shakers” explores the art-related themes of the Lantern’s production of 36 VIEWS.

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FULLY COMMITTED (Horizon): A zany one-man tour-de-force

One actor plays dozens of roles in a hilarious parody of the mad scramble for reservations at a trendy restaurant in Manhattan.

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PHOTOGRAPH 51 (Lantern): Discovering the secret of life

The backstory of Rosalind Franklin’s seminal image that led to the discovery of the double-helix structure of the DNA molecule is examined in an engrossing Philadelphia premiere.

Ben Dibble in DOUBT. Photo by Mark Garvin.

DOUBT: A Parable (Lantern): Some things are certain

It may be daunting for theaters to produce the original theatrical source for a well-regarded movie, but Lantern Theater Company’s DOUBT shows why some plays are worth reclaiming for the stage.

Daniel Fredrick as Valentine Coverly with toroise in Lantern Theater Company's production of ARCADIA. Photo by Mark Garvin.

“The Experiment”, part 3: ARCADIA (Lantern)

Michael Fisher continues his multi-part critical consideration of the Lantern Theater Company’s ARCADIA.

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“The Experiment”, part 1: ARCADIA (Lantern)

Part One of Michael Fisher’s multi-part critical experiment, reviewing the Lantern Theater Company’s production of ARCADIA several times over its run.

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“The Experiment”: ARCADIA (Lantern), Introduction to an experiment in criticism

Phindie writer Michael Fisher introduces his multi-part critical experiment, using the Lantern’s production of ARCADIA as his guinea pig subject.

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ARCADIA (Lantern): A great play is always timely

Stoppard’s genius is to permeate his play with deep philosophical contemplation while using the play to explore those same issues.

Charlie DelMarcelle. Photo by matthewjphoto.com

I AM MY OWN WIFE (Theatre Horizon): A story of perserverance

In Berlin in the wake of German reunification, American John Marks writes to his friend “Doug Wright” (I AM MY OWN WIFE’s playwright) about the eccentric Charlotte. Having “grown up gay in the Bible Belt”, Wright is fascinated by the transgender Berliner and spends grant money and savings to pay her a series of visits, hoping to turn his interviews into a play.

As related in act one of this short two-act piece, Charlotte’s tale fascinates Wright (and the Theatre Horizon audience).

Angela Smith as Harriet Smith, Trevor William Fayle as Mr. Elton, and Lauren Sowa as Emma Woodhouse in Lantern Theater Company's production of Jane Austen's EMMA (2013). Photo by Mark Garvin.

The Perfect Company in the Perfect City: REGENCY AND REVELRY at Lantern Theater Company

It’s now two hundred years ago that the famous line was published: “It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be…

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EMMA (Lantern): Meddlesome Matchmaking and Regency Amusements

The Lantern opens its twentieth anniversary season with the Philadelphia premiere of Jane Austen’s class-conscious romantic comedy of manners, in which a young idle-rich heroine’s matchmaking and meddling go awry…

Lantern Theater Company's production of Jane Austen's EMMA review

EMMA (Lantern): Philly falls for Austenmania

Over the past few years, there’s been a surprising and unlikely spark of interest in Jane Austen. Austen’s novels—Pride & Prejudice, Sense & Sensibility, Persuasion, et al—have been required reading for over…

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Flashpoint lights up the local scene with THE BENDS

Thom Weaver is familiar to me, as he may be to other Philadelphia theatergoers, because it seems every time I see a show with impressive lighting choreography and look in…

Megan Bellwoar (standing) and Mary Martello (seated) as Maureen and Mag Folan in Lantern Theater Company’s production of Martin McDonagh’s THE BEAUTY QUEEN OF LEENANE. Photo by Mark Garvin.

A Darker Emerald Isle: Lantern’s THE BEAUTY QUEEN OF LEENANE

The Lantern Theater Company’s production of THE BEAUTY QUEEN OF LEENANE completes its presentation of Martin McDonagh’s Leenane Trilogy, following 2007’s THE LONESOME WEST and 2011’s A SKULL IN CONNEMARA….