Joe Canuso

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IDEATION (Theatre Exile): How to succeed in business

The sterile corporate-speak of modern business pervades Aaron Loeb’s darkly comic contemporary play

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Theater in Sketch: TOMMY AND ME (Theatre Exile)

Looking at the past, TOMMY AND ME carries us into the psychological interaction between dreams and reality.

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LOST GIRLS (Theatre Exile): We are all capable of redemption

Yes, that was me sobbing on opening night of LOST GIRLS.

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RIZZO (PTC): A larger-than-life life onstage

An entertaining work about a compelling character, RIZZO displays pitfalls common to biographical drama.

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BIRDIE’S PIT STOP (On the Rocks): 2016 Fringe review 53

Haygen Brice Walker doesn’t aim for subtlety in the roasting humor of both Millennial political correctness and stereotypical southern backwardness, but he finds rich veins of comedy in his broad mine

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A Little Bird Who Fucks Everything Up: Interview with Haygen Brice Walker, the new enfant terrible of Philadelphia

Henrik Eger talks to Fringe playwright Haygen Brice Walker of BIRDIE’S PIT STOP (AND THE TRIBE OF QUEERS WHO FUCKED EVERYTHING UP).

Ray Didinger (Simon Canuso Kiley) meets his boyhood hero Tommy McDonald (Ned Pryce) back in the late 1950s in TOMMY & ME. Photo by Paola Nogueras.

TOMMY & ME (Theatre Exile): Theatrical touchdown

A lovely and elegiac look at how a sportswriter developed his love for football and friendship with an Eagles quarterback.

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TOMMY AND ME (Theatre Exile): There am I in the midst of them

TOMMY AND ME does a lot to make itself likable. Didinger’s love for McDonald is evident and provides a herculean effort towards making the play work. It’s incredibly tempting to allow yourself to be swept away in a sea of sincerity.

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THE PHILLY FAN (Montgomery): The time is always ripe for a Philly sports story

Though Bruce Graham’s play is set on the eve of a potential Philadelphia sports triumph it chronicles the long-suffering, patiently impatient diehard who supports local professional teams.

Matteo Scammell, winner of the Neal Zoren's award for Best Actor in Philadelphia, 2015.

The Best in Philadelphia Theater, 2015

Each January, local theater critic Neal Zoren announces his picks for the best in Philadelphia theater over the previous calendar year.

Jacob Merinar as storytelling rabbit Dandelion. Photo by Kathryn Raines & Plate | 3 Photography.

WATERSHIP DOWN (Simpatico/ Drexel MPiRP): A hop along a classic of children’s literature

Director Allen Radway coordinates an intricate but unpretentious array of parts into a coherent and appealing whole.

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RIZZO (Theatre Exile): A romp through the Rizzo years

Return with us now to those thrilling days of yesteryear when Frank Rizzo strode the city like he owned it.

Scott Greer and Amanda Schoonover  in Bruce Graham's RIZZO from Theatre Exile. 
Photo by Paola Nogueras.

RIZZO (Theatre Exile): A big hit on the “Big Bambino”

A world-premiere production on former Mayor Frank Rizzo portrays the good and the bad of the controversial Philadelphia icon.

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SPOOKFISH (Haygen Brice Walker and Jessica Schwartz): 2015 Fringe review 17

The scary midnight show is something of a Fringe tradition. SPOOKFISH fits the bill this year.

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2014/15 Critics’ Awards: The best in Philadelphia theater

Local theater writers vote for their favorites in twelve categories!

Ben Dibble, winner of "Best Actor" for his role in Herringbone at Flashpoint Theatre.

Picks for Best in Theater, 2014/15, by Philly Reviewer Neal Zoren

Each year, Philadelphia-based reviewer Neal Zoren announces his choices for the Helen and Morris Zoren Awards for World Theater. A fair number of the picks on Neal’s list are performers and productions from the Philadelphia area.

Pearce Bunting and Catharine Slusar star as George and Martha in Theatre Exile’s WHO’S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF (Photo credit: Paola Nogueras)

WHO’S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF (Exile): A tour-de-force production of an American classic

The iconic three-act, three-hour marathon of marital warfare eviscerates the myth of the American family, revealing the drama and devastation behind the façade of our societal expectations

Liz (Kate Czajkowski) and Charlie (Scott Greer) in Theatre Exile's THE WHALE by Samuel D. Hunter. Photo credit: Paola Nogueras.

THE WHALE (Theatre Exile): Intelligence and transformation moving under the surface

Not many plays have this kind of unmistakable resonance. When you encounter such a play, you know it. With works of consequence you can feel the pull of intelligence and transformation moving under the surface.

Exile, ANNAPURNA, CSlusar, PBunting, photo PNogueras

ANNAPURNA (Theatre Exile): A powerful Philadelphia premiere of playwright Sharr White

Black comedy, bitterness, and intimacy intertwine in Sharr White’s ANNAPURNA. Theatre Exile’s top-notch Philadelphia premiere of the gritty two-hander captures the dark humor and devastating hurt of their relationship, as they come to terms with broken love, debilitating loneliness and regret, and imminent death.

Photo by Paola Nogueras.

TRUE WEST (Theatre Exile): Sibling rivalry and the American dream

Sibling rivalry, conflicting personalities, and antithetical lifestyles regress to anti-social antics, primal rage, and role reversal in TRUE WEST, Sam Shepard’s dark comedy about two adult brothers, estranged for five…