Jered McLenigan

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BLOOD WEDDING (Wilma): Movement in the veins

Lorca’s BLOOD WEDDING makes a fitting vehicle for the Wilma Theater in-house troupe.

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Theater in Sketch: HOW TO USE A KNIFE (InterAct)

The InterAct Theater goes behind the scenes of a working kitchen

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HOW TO USE A KNIFE (InterAct): A sharp new play

Scene one is hilarious; scene two wipes the smile right off your face.

Lenta (Aneta Kerova) and the Old Woman (Azetz Papadopoulou). Sketch by Chuck Schultz.

ADAPT! (Wilma): On the brink of dawn

Blanka Zizka boldly steps forth as both debut playwright and seasoned director of the semi-autobiographical ADAPT!

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CONSTELLATIONS (Wilma): Love in the multiverse

“We have all the time we ever had.”

Aaron Cromie and Ian Merrill Peakes in Walnut Street Theatre’s PETER AND THE STARCATCHER (Photo credit: Mark Garvin).

PETER AND THE STARCATCHER (Walnut): A wacky look at the backstory of Peter Pan

An outstanding ensemble recounts the backstory of Peter Pan in a madcap prequel with music.

Marc LeVasseur as Oscar Wilde. Photo by Mark Garvin.

OSCAR WILDE: FROM THE DEPTHS (Lantern): A love that dared not speak its mind

With his brilliant work and tragic arc, Oscar Wilde remains a fascinating figure.

The 1990s called; they want their facade back.

What Can The Wilma Do With $10 Million?

A new $10 million in funds includes money for an updated facade, a cafe space, and a 10-member artistic company.

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Chatting with the Lantern’s Charles McMahon about his new play on Oscar Wilde

Charles McMahon discusses the inspiration, themes, and format of his new play on Oscar Wilde, prior to its world premiere with Lantern Theater Company.

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ANTIGONE (Wilma): Spectacular, but a spectacular failure

The man behind the 2013 Fringe Festival hit AJAX, The Madness directs his version of ANTIGONE for the Wilma Theater.

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Not of an Age: Remembering 10 years of Shakespeare in Clark Park

Performers past and present share their thoughts and memories on a decade of Shakespeare in Clark Park.

Jered McLenigan, Ed Swidey and Keith Conallen.

ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD (Wilma): A contemporary classic, in three parts

Tom Stoppard’s ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD is perhaps the most ubiquitous work of postmodern drama.

Ross Beschler and Zainab Jah in HAMLET. Photo by Alexander Iziliaev.

HAMLET (Wilma): Blanka Zizka’s daring production amazes while keeping its distance

Not unlike the U.S. Constitution, HAMLET endures partly because its imperfections and spaces allow for different ways to read it.

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The winners of the 2014 Barrymore Awards…

From about 100 entries, winners in twenty-two categories were selected by a panel of twelve judges and announced at the Barrymore Awards ceremony tonight. InterAct Theatre’s Down Past Passyunk won top…

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2013/14 Critics’ Awards: The best in Philadelphia theater

For the second year, Phindie asked local theater writers to vote on the best theatrical work produced in or near the city in the 2013/14 theater season.

Annie Henk, Jered McLenigan, David Bardeem in RITU COMES HOME. Photo by Kathryn Raines

RITU COMES HOME (InterAct): Two gay men who practice Safe Charity become parents

Jason (David Bardeen) and Brendan (Jered McLenigan) ease the paucity of Ritu’s (Rebecca Khalil) existence by sending monthly checks through an aid organization. The last thing in the world they’d ever expect would be for their charity case to show up in their living room.

(Photo credit: Mark Garvin)

THE RISE AND FALL OF LITTLE VOICE (Walnut): A 60-Second Review

Some of life’s biggest journeys begin with that one small voice in our heads, telling us to take an unexpected leap of faith. As a painfully shy young girl channeling bold songstresses of the past through her deceased father’s record collection, Ellie Mooney delightfully shows audiences how to find the power within, as the star of THE RISE AND FALL OF LITTLE VOICE.

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The fault, dear Brutus, is Super Racism: Makoto Hirano Criticizes Lantern’s Julius Caesar

“Will it be in yellow face,” my friend asked when I told him about Lantern Theater Company’s decision to stage Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar in feudal Japan, when what the meant was “in kimonos with some Japanese screens and music” seemed somehow culturally tone deaf.

Jered McLenigan as Marc Antony (Photo courtesy of Mark Garvin)

JULIUS CAESAR (Lantern): Political persuasion in feudal Japan

If William Shakespeare was alive today he’d be a …. well, he’d probably be a poet and playwright, but he’d also make a damn good political speechwriter. The crux of his JULIUS CAESAR, now in an accessible production by Lantern Theater Company, comes in a speech following the title character’s assassination.

Joe Guzmán and Forrest McClendon in THE TRAGEDY OF JULIUS CAESAR at the Lantern, with set design by Meghan Jones (Photo credit: Mark Garvin)

On the Universality of Shakespeare: Roman History through a Shoji Screen in the Lantern’s THE TRAGEDY OF JULIUS CAESAR

Director Charles McMahon, founding artistic director of the Lantern Theater Company, asserts that all of Shakespeare’s plays, whenever or wherever they’re set, are in fact observations about contemporary England. By shifting the locales to places outside of his homeland.