Jason Simms

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SEX WITH STRANGERS (PTC): Turn the page

Laura Eason’s play raises some interesting questions about love and art, but it is largely uninterested in exploring them.

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RUMORS (BRT): 60-second review

New York City deputy mayor Charlie Brock and his wife Myra are hosting a posh party, but something is amiss.

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AN ENEMY OF THE PEOPLE (BRT): Pollution and politics

Henrik Ibsen’s classic gets a beautiful production at Bristol Riverside Theatre.

David Howey and Beth Dixon in PTC’s OUTSIDE MULLINGAR (Photo credit: Mark Garvin)

OUTSIDE MULLINGAR (PTC): Land, loss, and love in rural Ireland

John Patrick Shanley’s rom-com charmer is a play about feelings, expressed with an Irish lilt by two generations of neighbors in the Emerald Isle

Andrew McMath stars in Bristol Riverside Theatre's LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS (Photo credit: BRT staff) 

LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS (Bristol Riverside Theatre): Don’t Feed the Plants!

The outlandish parody of the horror and sci-fi genres, now in production at Bristol Riverside Theatre, still elicits laughs and gasps from appreciative audiences and delights with a score of period-style rock, Motown, and doo-wop numbers. BRT’s show, directed with spot-on timing by Susan D. Atkinson, embraces all the retro-camp in the story of Seymour Krelborn

Photo by Mark Garvin

DEAR ELIZABETH (People’s Light & Theatre Company): Kindred Spirits in Poetry and Depression

Is a play told solely through the extant letters of its real-life characters really a play? Sarah Ruhl’s DEAR ELIZABETH, which traces the friendship between Elizabeth Bishop and Robert Lowell through their thirty years of correspondence (1947-77), seems more of a pedantic academic exercise in hero worship by a playwright who began her writing career as a poet and an admirer of Bishop’s oeuvre.

4000 Philadelphia Theatre Company review

4000 MILES (PTC): What a Long, Strange Trip it’s Been

As someone born in the mid-1980s, I’ve rolled my eyes at the sight of the word “Millennial” more times than I can count. What’s great about Amy Herzog’s 4000 MILES is that she refuses to imprison the characters in any social or political context.