Emilie Krause

Articles featuring Philadelphia actor Emilie Krause.

Arden Charlotte's Web

Theater in Sketch: CHARLOTTE’S WEB (Arden Theatre)

Looking at Arden Childrens Theater in words and sketch

Arden Theatre Charlotte's Web

Theater in Sketch: CHARLOTTE’S WEB (Arden)

Anaya Strutz puts on an aerial silk performance to create the miraculous spider web that saves Wilbur.

HELLO BLACKOUT (New Paradise Labs): 2017 Fringe review

More engrossing, more alienating, and more disciplined than its predecessor.

HELLO BLACKOUT! (New Paradise Laboratories): 2017 Fringe review

How can a radically plotless work communicate a complex and controversial theory?

JOHN (Arden): Things that haunt

There remains something compelling about ghost stories. Annie Baker’s JOHN demonstrates why: our past haunts just as well as any poltergeist.

RADIANT VERMIN (Inis Nua): Devilishly good home redecoration

An entertaining cautionary tale about the wages of greed and consumerism

In Process: PhiladelphiaDANCE.org’s new residency program to have its first showing with Sam Tower + Ensemble

Sam Tower + Ensemble will show a selection of In Process material that has resulted from their residence at CHI Movement Art Center.

I’D RATHER CHOKE THAN BE A QUITTER (Sam Tower + Ensemble): Grace versus crushing rage

A multimedia collaboration helmed by choreographer Sam Tower, who created last year’s Fringe hit 901 Nowhere Street.

FUNNYMAN (Arden): Comedy on the brink of tragedy

A new play by Bruce Graham considers the sadness that often underlies comedy and the need to adapt to changing styles and the struggles of life.

Second Acts: Top Philly playwright Bruce Graham talks FUNNYMAN and life in the theater

When you think Philadelphia theater, you think Bruce Graham. He shares his thoughts about his latest play, the state of theater in Philadelphia, and the art of writing plays.

Performing Art for the Price of a Sandwich: NICE AND FRESH returns to Mount Airy

The new series kicks off with shorts from Sam Tower/ Plant Me Here, The Naked Stark, John Rosenberg/ Hella Fresh, and Josh McIlvain/ SmokeyScout.

LA RONDE (Brenna Geffers): Moving around and switching around Schnitzler

A new site-specific re-envisioning of Schnitzler’s 19th-century play brings post-modern import to his now-historic examination of socio-sexual mores.

THE CHILDREN’S HOUR (EgoPo): A superbly acted historical anecdote

EgoPo Classic Theater continues its foray into classics of American drama with a focus on female playwrights.

901 NOWHERE STREET (Sam Tower + Ensemble): 2015 Fringe Review 25

The mysterious world of film noir is given a new twist as an all-female cast reconfigures the traditionally male crime-detective genre.

Nowhere Woman: Femme fatale Emilie Krause on 901 NOWHERE STREET

Emilie Krause talks about her Fringe play, her work as an actor and devisor, and how she’s probably not a real-ife femme fatale.

2014/15 Critics’ Awards: The best in Philadelphia theater

Local theater writers vote for their favorites in twelve categories!

Not of an Age: Remembering 10 years of Shakespeare in Clark Park

Performers past and present share their thoughts and memories on a decade of Shakespeare in Clark Park.

A Woman’s World: A conversation with Brenna Geffers, Lane Savadove, and Adrienne Mackey on bringing a new focus on women to Philadelphia theater

For the theme of its 2015–16 season, EgoPo Classic Theater has announced it will honor American female playwrights: Lillian Hellman, Clare Boothe Luce, and Sophie Treadwell.

Pearce Bunting and Catharine Slusar star as George and Martha in Theatre Exile’s WHO’S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF (Photo credit: Paola Nogueras)

WHO’S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF (Exile): A tour-de-force production of an American classic

The iconic three-act, three-hour marathon of marital warfare eviscerates the myth of the American family, revealing the drama and devastation behind the façade of our societal expectations

Matteo Scammell as the Beast in the Arden’s BEAUTY AND THE BEAST (Photo credit: Mark Garvin)

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST (Arden): An innovative retelling of a favorite fairytale

Director Whit MacLaughlin employs both live actors and shadow puppets to convey both the darkness and magic of the popular story.