Deborah Block

Philadelphia theater through the eyes of J. Cooper Robb, Part 2: 2004

Revisiting Philly theater history through the eyes of one of its finest critics.

Philadelphia Theater through the eyes of J. Cooper Robb, Part 1: 2002–2003

Remembering Philadelphia theater history through the eyes of a venerable theater reviewer.

SING THE BODY ELECTRIC (Theatre Exile): Electricity sparks and glows brightly, then sputters

Is there more still left in the playwright’s head that didn’t make it to the stage?

GUARDS AT THE TAJ (Theatre Exile): Beauty and brutality join hands

The debate central to Rajiv Joseph’s absorbing new play isn’t just talk: when you lose this one, you really lose.

SMOKE (Theatre Exile): Sexy but unsettling

Kim Davies’s SMOKE is a dangerous experiment in sexual politics In the taboo world of kink parties.

[podcast] Theatre Exile’s safe word is #SMOKE

Darnelle Radford chats to Deb Block about Theatre Exile’s production of SMOKE by Kim Davies

S&M, Sexual Politics, and SMOKE from a Female Perspective: An interview with Theatre Exile’s Deborah Block

Director Deborah Block discusses her approach to the socio-sexual themes in Theatre Exile’s Philadelphia premiere of Kim Davies’ SMOKE.

Liz (Kate Czajkowski) and Charlie (Scott Greer) in Theatre Exile's THE WHALE by Samuel D. Hunter. Photo credit: Paola Nogueras.

THE WHALE (Theatre Exile): Intelligence and transformation moving under the surface

Not many plays have this kind of unmistakable resonance. When you encounter such a play, you know it. With works of consequence you can feel the pull of intelligence and transformation moving under the surface.

RED SPEEDO (Theatre Exile): A dive into the waters of amorality

“We all do things that are sorta good, and things that are sorta not so good.” In RED SPEEDO, each character is capable of doing those things that are sorta not so good.

Playwright Lucas Hnath (Photo credit: Courtesy of Lucas Hnath)

A Conversation with Playwright Lucas Hnath, Director Deborah Block, and the Cast of Theatre Exile’s RED SPEEDO

Playwright Lucas Hnath raises serious legal, ethical, societal, and personal issues in RED SPEEDO, his 2013 play enjoying its Philadelphia premiere at Theatre Exile.

Is there money in theater? Where does it come from? Who gets it?

Phindie looks at tax returns for local theaters to see how much they brought in from what sources. We also look at who the best paid employee was for each “non-profit”.

Wes Haskell, Mary Tuomanen, and John Jarboe in COCK. Photo by Paola Nogueras

COCK (Theatre Exile): Spatial choreography reveals isolation, influence, and alliances.

Here’s the setup: A young man has lived with his male lover for a few years. During a spat he falls for a woman. Things have gotten complicated and he…

Photo by Paola Nogueras. Theatre Exile Cock Review

COCK (Theatre Exile): A Provocative Fight for Love and Identity

Finding love and self-knowledge beyond the fixed categories of sexual identity (gay, straight, or bi) is the central theme of Michael Bartlett’s COCK, now in its Philadelphia premiere at Theatre…

Michael Hollinger Theatre Exile

Studio X-hibition at Studio X

On May 6 this reviewer took in the second of three play readings in Theatre Exile’s New Play Development Series. On tap was FLESH, celebrated local playwright Michael Hollinger’s work-in-progress….

Tax time. Is there any money in theater?

Like the rest of us, theater companies have to file taxes. This tax day, we look at some information from the most recent publicly available tax returns (generally 2012) for some major and independent Philadelphia companies.