Christopher Colucci

Keith Conallen as Crumpet in Flashpoint’s THE SANTALAND DIAIRES (Photo credit: Courtesy of Flashpoint Theatre Company)

THE SANTALAND DIARIES (Flashpoint): The return of a hilarious holiday tradition

Flashpoint Theatre Company brings back its signature show for the holidays, David Sedaris’s THE SANTALAND DIARIES, for a ten-performance pre-Christmas run.

David Howey and Beth Dixon in PTC’s OUTSIDE MULLINGAR (Photo credit: Mark Garvin)

OUTSIDE MULLINGAR (PTC): Land, loss, and love in rural Ireland

John Patrick Shanley’s rom-com charmer is a play about feelings, expressed with an Irish lilt by two generations of neighbors in the Emerald Isle

Victoria Rose Bonito and J Hernandez star in BLOOD WEDDING (Photo credit: Kate Raines/PLATE 3 Photography)

BLOOD WEDDING (PAC/MPiRP): A symbiotic relationship between the arts and education

Love, betrayal, vengeance, and death are the themes of Federico García Lorca’s Spanish Symbolist tragedy, BLOOD WEDDING.

Director Damon Bonetti, captured during last night's "Blood Wedding" rehearsal, by Drexel photography student Cindi Landmesser.

PAC’s Damon Bonetti on BLOOD WEDDING: “Peace in a cruel world”

Phindie spoke to Damon Bonetti, a founding member of the Philadelphia Artists’ Collective and director of PAC’s latest offering, Frederico Garcia Lorca’s BLOOD WEDDING.

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The winners of the 2014 Barrymore Awards…

From about 100 entries, winners in twenty-two categories were selected by a panel of twelve judges and announced at the Barrymore Awards ceremony tonight. InterAct Theatre’s Down Past Passyunk won top…

William Zielinski and Kevin Bergen in ROW AFTER ROW at People’s Light (Photo credit: Mark Garvin)

ROW AFTER ROW (People’s Light): Finding the courage to fight and to heal

Local-born playwright Jessica Dickey considers the humor and heartache of mustering the courage to fight in an insightful comedy about three Civil War re-enactors.

Steve Pacek and Adam Altmanin THE 39 STEPS. Photo by Matthew J. Photography

THE 39 STEPS (Theatre Horizon): Thriller? I hardly know her!

Plot-wise, 39 STEPS stays quite true to the original film (often down to the dialogue), with a few other Hitchcock references thrown in for good measure. The difference? This play is the height of camp.

Maria Konstantinidis stars as Aldonza/Dulcinea in Act II Playhouse's production of "Man of La Mancha," now playing through June 8, 2014. Photo by Bill D'Agostino.

MAN OF LA MANCHA (Act II): 60-second review

MAN OF LA MANCHA is a play within a play. The production is the clear result of what happens when a group of professionals pour their talents into a common goal.

Alex Keiper and William Zielinski in DOWN PAST PASSYUNK. Photo by Kathryn Raines.

DOWN PAST PASSYUNK (InterAct): Theater ‘wit’ a taste of South Philly

I once heard then-governor Ed Rendell give some cheesesteak advice: for the real deal don’t go to one of the big name line-around-the-block places, go to a food truck or your local deli and get one made-to-order. I was thinking about this truism and our prevailing infatuation with authenticity as I watched A. Zell Williams’s world premiere production of DOWN PAST PASSYUNK at InterAct Theatre.

Jered McLenigan as Marc Antony (Photo courtesy of Mark Garvin)

JULIUS CAESAR (Lantern): Political persuasion in feudal Japan

If William Shakespeare was alive today he’d be a …. well, he’d probably be a poet and playwright, but he’d also make a damn good political speechwriter. The crux of his JULIUS CAESAR, now in an accessible production by Lantern Theater Company, comes in a speech following the title character’s assassination.

Joe Guzmán and Forrest McClendon in THE TRAGEDY OF JULIUS CAESAR at the Lantern, with set design by Meghan Jones (Photo credit: Mark Garvin)

On the Universality of Shakespeare: Roman History through a Shoji Screen in the Lantern’s THE TRAGEDY OF JULIUS CAESAR

Director Charles McMahon, founding artistic director of the Lantern Theater Company, asserts that all of Shakespeare’s plays, whenever or wherever they’re set, are in fact observations about contemporary England. By shifting the locales to places outside of his homeland.

Photo by Paola Nogueras.

TRUE WEST (Theatre Exile): a rare, in-your-face take on a modern classic

Theatre Exile mounts new, dicey plays and modern classics—badass classics, that is, from outstanding contemporary playwrights like Tracy Letts, Martin McDonough, and in this case, Sam Shepard. For anyone out…

1812 Productions THE BIG TIME review

THE BIG TIME: NEW VAUDEVILLE FOR THE HOLIDAYS (1812): Juggling seasonal laughs

Vaudeville has returned in all its glory with 1812’s THE BIG TIME: NEW VAUDEVILLE FOR THE HOLIDAYS. Pratfalls, double entendres, and caricatures of people past and present light up the…

Wes Haskell, Mary Tuomanen, and John Jarboe in COCK. Photo by Paola Nogueras

COCK (Theatre Exile): Spatial choreography reveals isolation, influence, and alliances.

Here’s the setup: A young man has lived with his male lover for a few years. During a spat he falls for a woman. Things have gotten complicated and he…

Photo by Paola Nogueras. Theatre Exile Cock Review

COCK (Theatre Exile): A Provocative Fight for Love and Identity

Finding love and self-knowledge beyond the fixed categories of sexual identity (gay, straight, or bi) is the central theme of Michael Bartlett’s COCK, now in its Philadelphia premiere at Theatre…

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EMMA (Lantern): Meddlesome Matchmaking and Regency Amusements

The Lantern opens its twentieth anniversary season with the Philadelphia premiere of Jane Austen’s class-conscious romantic comedy of manners, in which a young idle-rich heroine’s matchmaking and meddling go awry…