Bill Van Horn

Baskerville Walnut Street review

BASKERVILLE: A SHERLOCK HOLMES MYSTERY (Walnut Street): Ken Ludwig’s version turns the story on its head

An ancestral manor, a family curse, a fiend: Ken Ludwig’s version turns this Sherlock Holmes story on its head.

ROMEO & JULIET (Media): A Rose of any other name

The lights show a bare stage; the set is two dilapidated buildings with scaffolding. The curtains intermittently change from day to night with a transient light. The place is Verona,…

1776: THE MUSICAL (Media): Not your textbook history production

1776 will make you laugh, might even make you cry, and will most certainly be more enjoyable than the lectures of your middle school history teachers.

1776 THE MUSICAL (Media): Rollicking romp through history

A rocking, irreverent look at the birth of our nation wrought with lively, believable characters.

Aaron Cromie and Ian Merrill Peakes in Walnut Street Theatre’s PETER AND THE STARCATCHER (Photo credit: Mark Garvin).

PETER AND THE STARCATCHER (Walnut): A wacky look at the backstory of Peter Pan

An outstanding ensemble recounts the backstory of Peter Pan in a madcap prequel with music.

A CHRISTMAS STORY, THE MUSICAL (Walnut): Recollections of an unforgettable holiday

The Philadelphia debut of a popular musical is filled with humor, wonderment, and sentimental recollections of a child’s Christmas in 1940 Indiana.

A LIFE IN THE THEATRE (Walnut): 60-second review

David Mamet’s amusing A LIFE IN THE THEATRE uses the simple interplay of two actors backstage at a repertory company, to talk about life outside the theater.

Christopher Sutton as Buddy, with a supporting ensemble of elves, in the Walnut Street Theatre’s ELF (Photo credit: Mark Garvin)

ELF (Walnut): A family-friendly feel-good musical for the holidays

Based on the 2003 hit film of the same name, ELF, this year’s annual Christmas-time extravaganza at the Walnut Street Theatre, offers popular feel-good entertainment for the whole family. The amusing musical comedy is filled with magic and spectacle for the kids, wry jokes and innuendo for their grown-ups, and a familiar sentimental moral that is relevant for all ages. It’s a cute and snappy start to the holiday theater season that could make even the meanest Grinch smile.