Alexander Burns

KING LEAR (Quintessence): England at his feet

As Lear, Robert Jason Jackson is “every inch a king.

OLIVER! (Quintessence): Eat gruel, get pickpocketed, and become an orphan

Stepping back to a Victorian workhouse with Quintessence Theatre Group.

JULIUS CAESAR (Quintessence): Why must republics fall?

Quintessence Theatre Group explores the Shakespearean death throes of the Roman Republic.

Why Wait? Director Ken Marini talks about Quintessence Theatre’s brilliant WAITING FOR GODOT

Quintessence Theatre’s production of WAITING FOR GODOT just closed. Henrik Eger spoke to the director about his background and his experiences directing Samuel Beckett’s classic.

MY FAIR LADY (Quintessence): A splendid holiday gift

A jubilant mix of beautiful music and songs, dancing, magic, social politics… and elocution

The Mother of All Roles: E. Ashley Izard plays Mary Tyrone in LONG DAY’S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT

E. Ashley Izard tackles one of the most daunting roles in the American canon.

UNCLE VANYA (Quintessence): Tedious boring people

Good productions of Chekhov remind us of how vital his work still can be. Bad productions feed the narrative that his plays are dated, charmless, and inconsequential.

THE BROKEN HEART (Quintessence): Dark matter

Melancholy John Ford was more ‘himself’ and less ‘Shakespearean’ than other less bold Cavalier dramatists.

Theater in Sketch: MOTHER COURAGE

Some sketches of some Brecht.

MOTHER COURAGE AND HER CHILDREN (Quintessence): Epic theater!

Quintessence Theatre brings to life a beautifully staged, truly epic production of Bertolt Brecht’s MOTHER COURAGE AND HER CHILDREN, as brilliantly directed by Alexander Burns.

DOCTOR FAUSTUS (Quintessence): If you want to know everything, go to hell

A remarkably original and gloriously entertaining version of the Marlowe play.

SAINT JOAN (Quintessence): The Maid’s new clothes

George Bernard Shaw’s play is presented in rich tonalities of color, light, positioning, and sound. It is wide awake.

HANSEL AND GRETEL (Quintessence): Cool contemporary spin on Grimm

You don’t have to be ten years old to thoroughly enjoy this production, you just have to retrace the breadcrumbs and remember how to pretend again.

THE MANDRAKE (Quintessence): A Machiavellian sex satire

What could be so funny in a play written nearly 500 years ago? There is something for everyone to either laugh or balk at in this bawdy production of a play by Machiavelli.

ROMEO AND JULIET (Quintessence): What fray was here?

In the eyes of director Alexander Burns this doomed romance never stood a chance.

THE THREE MUSKETEERS (Quintessence): Swordplay and horseplay combine in a breezy adaptation

As always with an Alexander Burns production, imagery is rife, props are creative, and jokes come as much from sight gags as from dialogue.

Ian Merrill Peakes as Macbeth with Ben Dibble as Banquo. Photo by Mark Garvin.

MACBETH (Arden): Rare emotion and rarer straightforwardness [critical mass review #5]

The elements which displease other writers are what makes this production a success, according to Michael Fisher in review five of the ongoing Critical Mass series.

MACBETH (Arden): Shakepeare as spectacle [critical mass review #4]

It’s the fourth installment of the Critical Mass review of MACBETH at the Arden, but Julius Ferraro thinks too many works have already been written about an unremarkable piece of theater.