1812 Productions

The Roommate

THE ROOMMATE (1812 Productions): 60-second review

Where are Oscar and Felix when you really need them?

Philadelphia theater through the eyes of J. Cooper Robb, Part 2: 2004

Revisiting Philly theater history through the eyes of one of its finest critics.

Theater of the Extreme: Amanda Schoonover looks back on PHAEDRA’S LOVE

Henrik Eger talks to actor Amanda Schoonover about Sarah Kane and her career.

HOPE AND GRAVITY (1812 Productions): “Even the lightest things come crashing back down to earth.”

There are many good comedies out there, but not many where the weight of tragedy crests and wanes beneath the laughter.

THIS IS THE WEEK THAT IS (1812 Productions): New year same targets

Thom Nickels asks why the same people always get satirized.

Many Happy Returns: Trey Lyford wishes you HAPPY BIRTHDAY (1812 Productions)

Three married couples in a romp about infidelity who all have years of stage work and accolades to their names.

Neal Zoren’s BEST OF PHILADELPHIA THEATER, 2016

Neal Zoren chose his favorite productions, directors, and actors from the last year.

THE CAROLS (1812 Productions): Ghost of past holiday movies brought to comic life

A great entertainment present for Philly’s Christmas present.

THIS IS THE WEEK THAT IS: THE ELECTION SPECIAL (1812 Productions): Yuugely funny

Ho boy, it’s been quite the election cycle. Thankfully, Philadelphia has 1812 Productions to ease the pain with its annual satirical show.

Barrymore Awards Nominations

Industry insiders vote on their favorite shows and artists in their community from the preceding theater season. The resulting awards recognize the best that Philly stages have to offer, and also musicals.

[podcast] Jen Childs on I WILL NOT GO GENTLY

Today’s podcast features artistic director, writer, and performer Jen Childs. We talk about the latest 1812 offering, I Will Not Go Gently where a stellar team of creatives breathe life into the faded career of “Sierra Mist”.

I WILL NOT GO GENTLY (1812): Rage, rage against the dying of the light

The production keeps audience members of all ages laughing with outrageous and suggestive songs by Jennifer Childs and Christopher Colucci.

Not Going Gently: 1812 rocks with an album and a play

Harriet Power sits on a stool at a lightly stocked semi-circle bar in the corner of a spacious music room a block from the Ninth Street Market. She’s watching as…

THIS IS THE WEEK THAT IS (1812): The tenth anniversary of an annual favorite

This year’s installment of the annual politically-incorrect political comedy skewers the presidential candidates and brings some welcome laughs to a troubled week

THE SHOPLIFTERS (1812 Productions): 2015 Fringe review 2

An uproarious look into the reasons people steal, and why others chase them

Fringe Preview: THE LIGHT PRINCESS (Tony Lawton with Ugly Stepsister)

The creators/performers of THE LIGHT PRINCESS discuss the development of their adaptation of the 19th-century Scottish fairytale before its workshop production in the Fringe.

TO THE MOON (1812 Productions): An homage to The Great One, who was not so great after all

Whether you were a fan of The Honeymooners, or have never seen more than a clip on YouTube, this homage to The Great One reminds us of what comedy used to be like.

THIS IS THE WEEK THAT IS (1812): 60-second review

With references to Throwback Thursday, Snapchat, and that annoying five-second wait to skip a YouTube video, the show focuses our attention on the funny intricacies that make up our times.

Jennifer Childs and Tony Lawton star as Celia and Toby Teasdale in 1812 Productions’ INTIMATE EXCHANGES (Photo credit: Mark Garvin)

Intimate Exchanges (1812 Productions): 2014 Fringe Review 1.2

What makes film different from theater is that film is fixed forever, performances and lines repeating endlessly year after year, while theater has the ability to surprise us. And what makes theater different from life is that theater is scripted and life is random, unexpected, not planned out ahead of time. And what makes Philadelphia’s FringeArts Festival fun is that it delights in performances that confound expectations.

Jennifer Childs as Sylvie Bell and Tony Lawton as Lionel Hepplewick in 1812’s INTIMATE EXCHANGES (Photo credit: Mark Garvin)

INTIMATE EXCHANGES (1812 Productions): Fringe Review 1.1

Alan Ayckbourn’s inventive rom-com about failing and budding mid-life relationships in suburban London is that the play (or more accurately, the first volume of the playwright’s original two-volume work that is performed here) offers sixteen plot options and eight different endings. And for the first time in its production history, 1812 shines the spotlight on random members of the audience to decide spontaneously which path the characters should take as they reach a series of crossroads in their lives.