john rosenberg

A NICE AND FRESH sendoff: John Rosenberg’s last show in Philadelphia

Phindie has been a long-term champion of playwright John Rosenberg and his Hella Fresh Theater. There are pretty much no companies in Philadelphia focused on full seasons of original work, certainly none of the caliber reached in Rosenberg’s best plays, 2013′s Hannah and 2012′s Alp d’Huez.

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Photo: Johanna Austin

Egg Cartons, Cotton Candy, and Living Sculpture

Cotton candy for all, toppling egg cartons and cell phones playing songs by P!nk and Ed Sheeran. Miller Rothlein’s newest work, From the Spot Where We/You/I Stand (Stood), invited the audience directly into the performing space. The invisible wall between viewer and performer was broken; human interaction was foregrounded and the viewer was given an active voice in the work.

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Tommie Waheed Evans courtesy of PHILADANCO

Tommie Waheed-Evans unveils Aubade

Escaping the winter blues with tour stops in Los Angeles earlier this month touring the James Brown Project, Philadanco’s dancers were back at their home studios in Philly last weekend, rehearsing upcoming performances for their spring series here and an ensemble of five women preparing for a ballet to be performed in Verizon Hall onstage with the Philadelphia Orchestra this weekend.

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Free Beer. Have I said enough? Scratch Night returns at FringeArts

For several years now, the FringeArts Scratch Night series has been an in-the-know favorite on the Philadelphia performing arts scene. Each Spring and Summer in the lead up to the Fringe Fest, the organization hosts a monthly event to showcase in the works performances by LAB fellow, Fringe favorites, and other local artists.

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JULIUS CAESAR (Lantern): Political persuasion in feudal Japan

If William Shakespeare was alive today he’d be a …. well, he’d probably be a poet and playwright, but he’d also make a damn good political speechwriter. The crux of his JULIUS CAESAR, now in an accessible production by Lantern Theater Company, comes in a speech following the title character’s assassination.

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Joe Guzmán and Forrest McClendon in THE TRAGEDY OF JULIUS CAESAR at the Lantern, with set design by Meghan Jones (Photo credit: Mark Garvin)

On the Universality of Shakespeare: Roman History through a Shoji Screen in the Lantern’s THE TRAGEDY OF JULIUS CAESAR

Director Charles McMahon, founding artistic director of the Lantern Theater Company, asserts that all of Shakespeare’s plays, whenever or wherever they’re set, are in fact observations about contemporary England. By shifting the locales to places outside of his homeland.

View More On the Universality of Shakespeare: Roman History through a Shoji Screen in the Lantern’s THE TRAGEDY OF JULIUS CAESAR