NOT YOUR MOTHER’S MOTH (Megan Flynn & Teresa VanDenend Sorge): Fringe Review 64

Excerpted from thINKingDANCE. Republished by kind permission.

For a moment I thought I was in my grandmother’s house or meeting a close friend for tea. The performance space was quaint. The audience sat close to each other, separated from the stage by a line of pillows on the floor. The sunset cast a warm glow and the cool September breeze gently blew through the door.

Not-Your-Mothers-Moth_Megan-Flynn-Teresa-VanDenend-Sorge-300x225Everyone knows endearing (and sometimes annoying) remembrances related by elders. “When I was your age, gas was only twenty cents a gallon!” But rather than anecdotal facts, Megan Flynn and Teresa VanDenend Sorge’s NOT YOUR MOTHER’S MOTH recounted a history of lived experiences. Each piece reflected a cultivation of recollections. Each movement harbored significance. A curve of the arm referenced Grandma’s cookies on Sundays. An inward twist of the leg invoked the fear of asking the teacher for bathroom privileges. Deeply embedded memories were compacted into single gestures. Flynn and VanDenend Sorge captured the spirit of the Fringe season by experimenting within their art form as they intimately shared their pasts. Read the full article on thINKingDANCE.net. [Moving Arts of Mount Airy, 6819 Greene Street] September 13-14, 2014; fringearts.com/not-your-mothers-moth.

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About the author

Whitney Weinstein for thINKingDANCE

Whitney H. Weinstein arrived in Philadelphia in 2008 to expand on her small-town life in Lancaster, PA. Upon completion of her BFA in dance at Temple University, Whitney continued choreographing small masterpieces and instilling knowledge in young dancers at Orlandi Dance Center, the Lionville Community YMCA, and Barclay Early Childhood Education Center. She is interested in bridging the gap between being a pedestrian and dance professional with coEXIST Dance Company, and analyzes that gap with thINKingDANCE. With a range of experience from her many roles as teacher, student, performer, and traveler, Whitney furthers her explorations of multiple art forms by shifting through different communities. Whitney has grooved with artists such as LEVYdance, Tiffany Mills, and Janis Brenner, and frolicked with Dangerous and Movin’ Dance Company, Hypen-Nation Arts, Dance Max Moving Company, Grant Street Dance Company, Youtheathre, CoJoMotion, and Temple University concerts.