Theater

The best source for independent coverage of Philadelphia theater.

Promotional image for New City Stage Company’s WHAT HAPPENS IN THE WHITE HOUSE, STAYS IN THE WHITE HOUSE by Voices for a New City Ensemble (Photo credit: Courtesy of New City Stage Company)

WHAT HAPPENS IN THE WHITE HOUSE, STAYS IN THE WHITE HOUSE (New City): A New Perspective on First Families

New City Stage Company’s West Wing Festival on presidential politics concludes with a satirical take on the past and future occupants of the White House. Imaginative, amusing, and cynical, it considers how their private relationships and distinctive personalities might have impacted our history and could influence world affairs.

Erik Ransom (Photo credit: David J. Martin Photography; Warholization by Deb Miller)

Erik Ransom Takes New York by Storm!

New Jersey native Erik Ransom developed a huge following in Philadelphia with his original work COMING: A ROCK MUSICAL OF BIBLICAL PROPORTIONS, for which he wrote the book, music, and lyrics, and also starred as glam-rock protagonist Damian Salt.

Bi(?!)lingual by Asaki Kuruma

SOLOW FLASH INTERVIEWS 2014, EPISODE FIVE: Meredith Sonnen, Sam Henderson and Asaki Kuruma

SoLow Fest 2014 sweeps the city this June. Floods of performances. Floods of performers. Get swept up!

To give you a clearer picture of what’s in store, freelance writer/performer Julius Ferraro conducts a series of flash interviews of our artists.

This episode we have Ingrid Bergman in South Philly, theatrical memoir on Vine, and porn at Quig’s.

Ian Merrill Peakes, Mary Martello, and Paul L. Nolan in Arden Theatre Company’s Incorruptible by Michael Hollinger. Photo by Mark Garvin

INCORRUPTIBLE (Arden): Laughter in the monastery

The set of Michael Hollinger’s witty INCORRUPTIBLE looks like it has been there for hundreds of years, transporting one back to the days of monks and minstrels. At the Abbey…

Manon Manavit

Manon Manavit: Taking Philadelphia by Sturm und Drang

Phindie talks to Manon Manavit, a future star of Philadelphia performing arts, before her debut show in the city. She just relocated from Montreal, where she worked with Cirque Du Soleil.

CatCal] by Danielle Solomon

SOLOW FLASH INTERVIEWS 2014, EPISODE FOUR: Lesley Berkowitz, Clara Elser & Danielle Solomon

SoLow Fest! In the house. (In many houses.) This month. OMG. Across Philly’s various neighborhoods, artists of all shapes, sizes and specialities are working on over 35 different shows. How…

Kate Brennan

Philadelphia Misses Kate Brennan: Interview with the now NYC-based actor and producer

Kate Brennan lit up the Philadelphia stages for years as an actor and producer for BCKSEET Productions. Now NYC-based, she’s back in town this summer for an offbeat theater camp. Phindie asks her about this and her memories of Philly.

Tananya Garza.

30/30 Vision: Tamanya Garza on Latinos in Philadelphia theater

Phindie talked to Tamanya Garza, a longtime leader of the Philadelphia Latino theater community and director of EL NOGALAR, part of the three-play 30/30 series exploring Latino theater.

Image courtesy of Michael Durkin

SOLOW FLASH INTERVIEWS 2014, EPISODE THREE: Michael Durkin, Joshua McLucas and Michael Broussard

The fifth SoLow Fest features over forty individual shows across Philadelphia. How are you supposed to pick which ones you want to see? They only cost $5 (or whatever you want to fork over—Lo, the magic of Pay What You Can) so you can see more than one so long as you know what’s going on.

To give you a clearer picture of what’s in store, freelance writer/performer Julius Ferraro conducts a series of flash interviews of our artists!

Philadelphia theater calendar

Philadelphia Theater Calendar: June 2014

January | February | March | April | May | June July | August | September | October | November | December Dr. Seuss’s The Cat in the Hat. Based on the book by Dr. Seuss. April 16–June 22, 2014. Arden Theatre Company, 40…

This painting is valued at $250 million.

Putting the value on the art of performing art

The support for performing arts organizations and artists, of all sizes, pales in comparison to the type of funding that art museums obtain. It is time to start placing more value on the “art” part of performing arts.

the-screwtape-letters

THE SCREWTAPE LETTTERS (Lantern): 60-second review

The Lantern Theater Company’s remount of THE SCREWTAPE LETTERS by C.S. Lewis is a sizzling show from hell. Kathryn Osenlund’s 60-second review

Solstice. Image courtesy of Douglas Williams.

SOLOW FLASH INTERVIEWS 2014, EPISODE TWO: DOUGLAS WILLIAMS, GAVIN WHITT, and HANK CURRY

Needless to say, with over forty individual shows slated to pop up across Philly from June 19-29, it can be hard to decide where you’re going to spend your pocket money.

To give you a clearer picture of what’s in store, freelance writer/performer Julius Ferraro conducts a series of flash interviews of our artists!

In episode two, we get Chaplin in Queen Village, time travel in South Philly, and brain spasms in Kensington.

Image courtesy of Corey Bechelli

SOLOW FLASH INTERVIEWS 2014, EPISODE ONE: COREY BECHELLI, DAVID LAWSON, and ELLIE BROWN

While excitement mounts for SoLow Fest’s wooden anniversary, our artists are all at different stages of production. Some are re-memorizing old scripts, some are putting on the finishing touches on new compositions, and others are still hard at work in the studio.

Needless to say, with over forty individual shows slated to pop up across Philly from June 19-29, it can be hard to decide where you’re going to spend your pocket money.

To give you a clearer picture of what’s in store, freelance writer/performer Julius Ferraro conducts a series of flash interviews of our artists!

JoeySlotnick_MichaelNathanson2

CHAPTER TWO (Bucks County Playhouse): 60-second review

Directed by Marsha Mason, the actress in the original film adaptation, Neil Simon’s CHAPTER TWO is a romantic comedy/drama in the spirit of the Hotel Suite.

Steve Pacek and Adam Altmanin THE 39 STEPS. Photo by Matthew J. Photography

THE 39 STEPS (Theatre Horizon): Thriller? I hardly know her!

Plot-wise, 39 STEPS stays quite true to the original film (often down to the dialogue), with a few other Hitchcock references thrown in for good measure. The difference? This play is the height of camp.

Photo credit Kate Raines.

COMMUNITAS (Almanac): The Contortionist and the Dancer

The action in COMMUNITAS could be best described as four people taking turns carrying one another around a space, then falling off, then swapping who carries whom. In a way, it is structured around a continual exploration of ways to make two or more people into one. Balance is challenged not by standing on a tight rope, but by joining two bodies at a single point and leaning precipitously apart; disassemble and repeat as necessary.

The Company. Photo by Mark Garvin.

HOW TO SUCCEED IN BUSINESS WITHOUT REALLY TRYING (Walnut Street Theatre): 60-Second review

J. Pierrepoint Finch (Jeremy Morse) is a determined window washer with a handbook “How to Succeed in Business” and a dream to navigate the corporate maze. Step one: apply for the job at a major corporation.

Incubator artist Asaki Kuruma

NOTES from the INCUBATOR (Simpatico): Entry Three: World of BI(?!)LINGUAL

When you hear the word “bilingual” what do you picture in your mind? International, business-y personnel? Or one of those lucky kids who happened to have parents who speak different languages? Or growing up in a different country? Well, I’m don’t fit in any of those scenarios, except being international, sure, but that’s about it. None of my family speaks English. I learned it in school because I had to, and was awful at it. I hated the subject throughout the years of forced education. But then life turns in a strange way, and somehow I ended up in this city with an unpronounceable name for almost a decade now. My every day life is in English. I ask myself over and over again: “What am I doing here?”

Photo © Jacques-Jean Tiziou / www.jjtiziou.net.

Interview with Charlotte Ford: The untenable career of a successful Philadelphia theater artist

Philadelphia’s theater scene is better than ever—haven’t you heard? But so few of its practitioners can eke out a living wage from it. This interview Charlotte Ford takes a serious look at how poor the health of the theater industry is in this city.