Photo by Mark Garvin.

METAMORPHOSES (Arden): A swim with the gods

This visceral production explains why humans act the way that we do, and reveres love as the most sacred of experiences.


CLOSER (Eagle): Words are not enough

Patrick Marber is a master of words. But in this production words, well composed as they are, are not enough.

Photo by Shawn May.

ROMEO AND JULIET (Quintessence): What fray was here?

In the eyes of director Alexander Burns this doomed romance never stood a chance.


GYPSY (Media Theatre): Everything’s coming up roses

GYPSY is an often produced classic for good reason and is terrific as Mama Rose in the Media Theatre’s production.


V TO X (GoKash): Truth behind bars

This world premiere play takes a deeply affecting look at the social carnage caused by mass imprisonment.

Mary Beth Shrader and Brock Vickers.

BULLSHOT CRUMMOND (Hedgerow): On-target farce

Mark Tallman’s brisk, amiable production moves easily between farcical comedy and intuitive and intelligent theater.

Nathan Foley, Charlotte Northeast,  Sarah Fraunfelder and Damon Bonetti in GOD OF CARNAGE.
Photo by Angela McMichael

GOD OF CARNAGE (Montgomery Theater): A rich unraveling

Civilization is not easy to maintain. One knock and the lapse of a moment can set it off kilter.

Stephen Powell as Giorgio Germont and Lisette Oropesa as Violetta in Opera Philadelphia’s LA TRAVIATA (Photo credit: Kelly & Massa)

LA TRAVIATA (Opera Philadelphia): A stunning new design and a stellar new Violetta

A refreshed rendition of Verdi’s tragic opera features the impressive house and role debut of Lisette Oropesa as the titular “fallen woman” and a stunning design that purposefully pairs the distant past with recent times.

Megan Nicole Arnoldy and Paul Schaefer in HIGH SOCIETY. Photo by Mark Garvin.

HIGH SOCIETY (Walnut): A curious Philadelphia Story

A curiously performed version of Arthur Kopit’s unnecessary rearranging and cheapening of The Philadelphia Story.

Susannah Hoffman and Dylan McDermott in BABY DOLL. Photo by Richard Termine.

BABY DOLL (McCarter): Not a girl, not yet a woman

In Tennessee Williams’s script for 27 Wagons Full of Cotton and the 1956 screenplay that derives from it, Baby Doll, everybody puts Baby in a corner.


MAURITIUS (Stagecrafters): Stamp of suspense

Theresa Rebeck’s thriller with a philatelical twist leaves a stamp of suspense on an appreciative audience.


EURYDICE (Villanova Theatre): Death is a continuation of life

Death, as experienced in director James Ijames’s comic yet movingly evocative production of Sarah Ruhl’s play, is a continuation of life.


BLACK MALE REVISITED (XPN/ Jaamil Kosoko): Fringe review 71

The dark space at the headquarters of Fringe Arts hosted a kaleidoscope of blackness. Sad blackness. Angry blackness. Rescued blackness. Incarcerated blackness. Lost blackness. Dead blackness.


ALL MY SONS (People’s Light): A treat from the golden age of American theater

Seeing a naturalistic play by one of the masters of the form, Arthur Miller, with a cast and set that are as realistic and as authentically moving as the text, is a rarity and a treat.


BELLOWS FALLS (Leah Stein Dance Company): Fringe review 70

Stein makes you notice things about the Iron Factory that you would not have noticed before

2. Lantern, PHOTOGRAPH 51, HWatermeier, GPerrier, phto MGarvin

PHOTOGRAPH 51 (Lantern): Discovering the secret of life

The backstory of Rosalind Franklin’s seminal image that led to the discovery of the double-helix structure of the DNA molecule is examined in an engrossing Philadelphia premiere.


SECOND SKULL (Sothis Music-Theater Ensemble): Fringe review 69

Sothis devises experimental theater to call attention to collective and conscious freedom.


BOING! (Vervet Dance): Fringe review 68

The Philadelphia Fringe Festival aims to celebrate innovation and creativity, and Vervet Dance certainly lived up to that goal


WALLS (Darcy Lyons): Fringe review 67

Covering everything from a cell wall to the Great Wall of China, WALLS explores of how walls—and the acts which build and destroy them—shape lives


SOUL PROJECT (David Zambrano): Fringe review 66

An intensely physical performance rooted in an extreme manifestation of experience, SOUL PROJECT, is able to create a powerful reaction of joy and passion