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THE GUN SHOW (Passage): Let me tell you some stories about guns

EM Lewis accomplishes two simultaneous intentions—to tell a story theatrically and to spur perspective on guns.

Atandwa Kani, Mncedisi Shabangu, and Atandwa Kani in SIZWE BANZI IS DEAD.

SIZWE BANZI IS DEAD (McCarter): Being a man in apartheid

SIZWE BANZI IS DEAD is genuine work of theater and an authentic, authoritative look at a shameful period of South African history.

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INTO THE WOODS (dir, Rob Marshall): Movie review

“Into the Woods” goes beyond fairy tale into exploring a basic human dilemma, how to fight a destructive common enemy.

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BIG EYES (dir. Tim Burton): Movie review

Republished by kind permission from NealsPaper.com. Though Tim Burton plays it straight in this movie about a monomaniac who uses his wife’s talent to feed his ego and become fabulously…

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WILD (dir. Jean-Marc Vallée): Movie review

This is a movie about one woman gaining personal survival skills that will give her confidence to face the vicissitudes of everyday life when she returns to it.

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THE IMITATION GAME (dir. Morten Tyldum): Movie review

Morten Tyldum does a fine job of blending two stories: Alan Turing’s role in deciphering Nazi Germany’s Enigma Code, and his arrest and conviction for gross indecency.

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BIRDMAN (dir. Alejandro González Iñárritu): Movie review

The spirit of Samuel Taylor Coleridge has to be invoked practically every minute Alejandro González Iñárritu’s “Birdman” digitally projects on the screen.

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FOXCATCHER (dir. Bennett Miller): Movie review

Republished by kind permission from NealsPaper.com. The characters in “Foxcatcher” are laconic in general and, when they do talk, speak in short, clipped phrases that compactly communicate what they want…

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MARY POPPINS (Walnut): Flying between lightness and gravitas

In doing MARY POPPINS, a director has to decide between approaches: light and fantastical like the movie or darker like the book.

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THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING (dir. James Marsh): Movie review

“The Theory of Everything” is a strong story because it’s one of care and victory.

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ST. VINCENT (dir. Theodore Melfi): Movie review 

The wastrel with a heart may not be a new character, but Bill Murray plays Vince with a satisfied nonchalance that makes this cliché watchable.

Carlo Campbell, Ryan Walter (as Audrey), Sean Close (as Touchstone), Lee Cortopassi (as Amiens). (Photo by Shawn May)

AS YOU LIKE IT (Quintessence): Do you not know I am a woman?

Burns and his cast humanize Shakespeare’s characters and provide a smart, jolly time that is tinged with genuine sentiment.

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LITTLE ROCK (Passage Theatre): Integrating history into theater

Rajendra Ramoon Maharaj’s poignant play about nine children who integrate Little Rock’s Central High School creates a lasting impression.

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THE 39 STEPS (Bristol Riverside Theatre): Intense mystery and low comedy

Intense mystery and low comedy combine in Patrick Barlow’s stage version of THE 39 STEPS.

Wednesday (Lauren Cupples) loves to please with her dinner treats. Photo by Chris Jordan.

THE ADDAMS FAMILY (Media Theatre): A weird-family musical

THE ADDAMS FAMILY is such a familiar piece, and beloved by many for various reasons

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9 TO 5: THE MUSICAL (Walnut Street): Performance over plot

Sharp performances keep 9 TO 5 so consistently entertaining it masks a contrived plot and mediocre music and lyrics.

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THE MUSICAL OF MUSICALS (Montgomery Theater): A homage and a takeoff in song

Eric Rockwell and Joanne Bogart raise the stakes with their devilishly clever and cheekily smart send-up of prolific songsmiths Sondheim, Jerry Herman, Andrew Lloyd Webber, Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein II, John Kander, and Fred Ebb, THE MUSICAL OF MUSICALS.

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CIRCLE MIRROR TRANSFORMATION (Theatre Horizon): All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women…

Life doesn’t imitate art as much as combine with it as Baker’s play, and Matthew Decker’s production of it for Theatre Horizon, sneaks up on you and moves you.