2. PL&TC, 3 MUSKETEERS, TTeti, LWalton, phto MGarvin

THE THREE MUSKETEERS (THE LATER YEARS): A MUSICAL PANTO (People’s Light): The triumphant return of a holiday favorite

The annual panto returns with a wacky take on Alexandre Dumas’ beloved adventure story of 17th-century France.

Craig Mulhern Jr. and Lyn Philistine in A CHRISTMAS STORY at the Walnut Street Theatre (Photo credit: Mark Garvin)

A CHRISTMAS STORY, THE MUSICAL (Walnut): Recollections of an unforgettable holiday

The Philadelphia debut of a popular musical is filled with humor, wonderment, and sentimental recollections of a child’s Christmas in 1940 Indiana.

1. Burton cover


Interviews with fifteen of Philadelphia’s noted contemporary playwrights give insights into the city’s flourishing theater community.

1. MERLIN AND WART, Steve Wei, Andrew Blasenak, photo KStackhouse

MERLIN AND WART (Kevin Stackhouse): Theater in the service of social reform

An intensely disturbing and impactful new play imagines the horrendous neglect and abuse suffered by two severely ill patients at Byberry Mental Hospital on the day of its closing in 1987.

1. Eagle, BONNIE AND CLYDE, MGriffin-Smith, SPavia, phto CMiller

BONNIE & CLYDE (Eagle): The passions and hardships of folk-hero outlaws

A dramatic, funny, and sympathetic portrayal of the infamous lovers and their crime spree during the Great Depression is set to music with a southern twang.


[NYC] KING CHARLES III (Stuart Thompson, Sonia Friedman Productions, and Almeida Theatre): A savvy foray into future history

A future history play, evocative of Shakespeare, imagines political intrigue, public crises, and personal dilemmas within Britain and the royal family following Prince Charles’s ascension to the throne.

IRC’s ALL IN THE TIMING features Andrew Carroll, Jennifer MacMillan, and David Stanger as chimps in “Words, Words, Words” (Photo credit: Johanna Austin @ AustinArt.org)

ALL IN THE TIMING (IRC): Six fast and funny existentialist shorts

A collection of six short one-act comedies address the existentialist dilemma and pose the ubiquitous question, “What if?”

Hannah Van Sciver is The Poet (written by Schnitzler as a male role) in Brenna Geffers’ deconstruction of LA RONDE (Photo credit: Courtesy of the Artists)

LA RONDE (Brenna Geffers): Moving around and switching around Schnitzler

A new site-specific re-envisioning of Schnitzler’s 19th-century play brings post-modern import to his now-historic examination of socio-sexual mores.

1. Mechanical, THE MADNESS OF POE, NBoyle, phto ESingel

THE MADNESS OF POE (Mechanical): A spellbinding production for the Halloween season

An original and inventive adaptation of Poe interweaves stories by the Master of the Macabre within the period rooms of Historic Strawberry Mansion.

Kevin Rodden, Kirsten Quinn, Gina Martino, Ethan Lipkin, and Dexter Anderson

(Photo credit: Armen Pandola and Alexis Mayer)

JUNO AND THE PAYCOCK (IHT): A tragi-comic call for personal responsibility and peace in troubled times

The second installment in playwright Sean O’Casey’s tragi-comic “Dublin Trilogy” traces the misfortunes of a struggling Irish family during the Irish Civil War.

Scott Greer and Amanda Schoonover as Frank and Carmella in Theatre Exile’s RIZZO (Photo credit: Paola Nogueras)

RIZZO (Theatre Exile): A big hit on the “Big Bambino”

A world-premiere production on former Mayor Frank Rizzo portrays the good and the bad of the controversial Philadelphia icon.

Marc Bamuthi Joseph at a student meet and greet for Opera Philadelphia’s We Shall Not Be Moved (Photo credit: Philip Todd)

Opera Is Now Open: Opera Philadelphia Unveils its Plans for O17

Opera Philadelphia announces its new cutting-edge direction with a twelve-day urban opera festival that will debut in September 2017.

Teri Lamm and Mary Elizabeth Scallen in AUCTIONING THE AINSLEYS at People’s Light (Photo credit: Mark Garvin)

AUCTIONING THE AINSLEYS (People’s Light): Familial dysfunction, memory, and the significance of objects

Laura Schellhardt’s foray into the Pop psychology of familial dysfunction and the significance of personal possessions is given its regional premiere.

3. Inis Nua, HOOKED promo image

Old Friends and Frequent Collaborators Get HOOKED! An interview with Tom Reing and Charlie DelMarcelle

Director Tom Reing and actor Charlie DelMarcelle talk about their childhood, their collaborations, and Inis Nua’s upcoming production of HOOKED!

Stephen Powell as Giorgio Germont and Lisette Oropesa as Violetta in Opera Philadelphia’s LA TRAVIATA (Photo credit: Kelly & Massa)

LA TRAVIATA (Opera Philadelphia): A stunning new design and a stellar new Violetta

A refreshed rendition of Verdi’s tragic opera features the impressive house and role debut of Lisette Oropesa as the titular “fallen woman” and a stunning design that purposefully pairs the distant past with recent times.

Harry Smith (Photo credit: Xanthe Elbrick)

From the UK to Philadelphia to Broadway: An interview with actor Harry Smith

British-born actor Harry Smith talks about his background in the UK, his life and career in Philadelphia, and his upcoming debut on Broadway.

2. Lantern, PHOTOGRAPH 51, HWatermeier, GPerrier, phto MGarvin

PHOTOGRAPH 51 (Lantern): Discovering the secret of life

The backstory of Rosalind Franklin’s seminal image that led to the discovery of the double-helix structure of the DNA molecule is examined in an engrossing Philadelphia premiere.

2. Rev Shakes, LLL pre-show concert, photo LBerkowitz (1)

LOVE’S LABOUR’S LOST (Revolution Shakespeare): Fringe review 61

A clever new take on Shakespeare’s early romantic comedy imparts the flavor of 1960’s-70s Americana with live country-rock music and a multi-talented cast of actors/singers/musicians.

2. Ballet Fleming, INTO THE LIGHTS, rehearsal, Amanda Hill and Nick Peregrino

INTO THE LIGHTS (Dancefusion & Ballet Fleming): Fringe review 59

Modern dance meets contemporary ballet in an expressive collaboration by two of Philadelphia’s top-notch companies.

1. POC, JUMP THE MOON, ACrosby, KKunkle, ptho JWallace

JUMP THE MOON (Philadelphia Opera Collective): Fringe review 57.1

An experimental world-premiere opera gives voice to the unsung women heroes of astrophysics at Harvard in the 1890s, with a cutting-edge score, non-linear libretto, and expressionist movement.