THE AERONAUTS (dir. Tom Harper): 2019 Philadelphia Film Festival review

Fun, thrilling, and unpredictable. An action movie for the post-superhero world.

SUNSET OF MULHOLLAND DRIVE (dir. Uli Gaulke, Agnes Lisa Wegner): 2019 Philadelphia Film Festival review

Sunset Over Mulholland Drive is not interested in exploration, only adoration.

GRETA (dir. Neil Jordan): Film review

I say women were “placed” in these roles when what I really mean is “stuffed.”

UNTOGETHER (dir. Emma Forrest): Film review

Angela Harmon reviews the new movie by director Emma Forrest.

EMPATHY, INC. (dir. Yedidya Gorsetman): Film review

The film explores the lengths that someone will go just to save their reputation and/or bank account.

PROSPECT (dir. Chris Caldwell, Zeek Earl): Philadelphia Film Festival review

In this world, space isn’t the final frontier. It’s the California desert post-gold rush.

BATHTUBS OVER BROADWAY (dir. Dava Whisenant): Philadelphia Film Festival review

Call me a snob, but I’ve never understood the idea of enjoying something ironically. The enjoyment of the “it’s so good it’s bad” phenomena for movies like The Room tend…

THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI (dir. Martin McDonagh): Philadelphia Film Festival review

“Raped while dying,” the first billboard reads. The next, “And still no arrests,” and finally, “How come, Chief Willoughby?”

BREATHE (dir. Andy Serkis): Philadelphia Film Festival review

What is most impressive about Breathe is its unimpressiveness. And that is a sincere compliment.

EX MACHINA (dir. Alex Garland): Movie review

Ex Machina is the first feature film directed by Alex Garland, and it’s a statement of purpose that follows gracefully upon the modus operandi he’s set for himself as a screenwriter and producer.

TRUE STORY (dir. Rupert Goold): Movie review

Truth may be stranger than fiction, but trying to shove that truth back into a fabricated format (a movie) does not often work on its own.

IT FOLLOWS (dir. David Robert Mitchell): Movie review

The sophomore effort of three-first-name writer and director David Robert Mitchell is a 100-minute-long teen indie horror flick, and it’s taking everyone by surprise.